Agriculture

Australian landscape

Progressive filmmaker, Damon Gameau spoke with Green Left about his new film, a response to the devastating 2019–20 bushfires.

Ecosocialist Bookshelf March

Climate & Capitalism editor Ian Angus presents five new books for reds and greens.

The PM has announced a funding package to boost the koala's long-term protection and recovery efforts. But, as Binoy Kampmark argues this avoids the two major causes for its population dwindling: climate change and habitat destruction through other means.

Thanks to manoeuvring by the United States, the prospects for peace and self determination for Western Sahara have suffered a serious setback, writes Vijay Prashad.

Kanak labourers in a Qld sugarcane plantation. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Alex Salmon reviews a new book by historian and author Graham Seal that documents how the British government shipped more than 376,000 men, women and children across the oceans to provide slave labour in its colonies.

The Indian farmer's movement is a demonstration that people power can preserve the public sector and has become an inspiration for labourers around the world to take on neoliberalism and fascism, writes Gauri Gandbhir.

In a new book, Stan Cox dismisses the anti-science and racism of climate denialists, strips bare the insincerity of the Biden administration, and uncovers the lurking dangers of energy denial, writes Don Fitz.

Climate expert, Australian National University emeritus professor and Climate Council member Will Steffen speaks to Green Left about climate science and politics in the lead up to the COP26 United Nations climate summit in Glasgow.

Indigenous peoples from 30 villages in Hasdeo Aranya, the densely-forested region of central India, walked 300 kilometres in early October, to demand the protection of their water, forests and land against coalmining, reports Ruchira Talukdar.

A slew of anti-Indigenous legislation, escalating violence and the COVID-19 pandemic threaten the existence of Brazil’s original people, reports Nick Estes.

For the second year in a row, Colombia has been ranked the world’s most dangerous country for environmentalists by an international human rights group, reports Ian Ellis-Jones.

Almond plantations are guzzling so much water from the Murray Darling Basin that even the Almond Board of Australia wants new orchards to be put on hold until the water supply can be assured. Daniel Pedersen reports.

More and more US transnationals have opened up in Mexico over the past few decades, taking advantage of unfair trade agreements, super-exploitative labour conditions and cheap utilities, reports Tamara Pearson.

The primary inspiration for The Red Deal was the People’s Agreement of Cochabamba, adopted at the World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth in 2010, writes Simon Butler.

Urban organic agriculture in Havana

The COVID-19 pandemic has worsened global food insecurity. An estimated 132 million more people have been tipped into acute malnutrition since the pandemic began, writes Barry Healy.

The IPCC's latest report should be a wake-up call to governments everywhere, but it's going to take more than science to force action by the biggest global emitters, writes Barry Sheppard.

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