Analysis

Caroline de CostaJacinta O'Leary and Jonathan Strauss discuss the federal government's ongoing attacks on refugees and rising resistance to this policy.

People will be ushering in the New Year, hoping that the “shit year that was 2020” can be put behind. But not for 330,000 people, who will be pushed into poverty when the next coronavirus supplement is cut, writes Peter Boyle.

Sue Bull reports on oil refinery Viva Energy's new plans for gas and a public bail-out.

An anti-coal seam gas mural on a building in Pilliga township

Green Left's Mat Ward was as pissed off as most people when Santos' coal seam gas project was approved in Narrabri, despite 98% of people opposing it. He decided to spend a few days cycling the area in the north-west of New South Wales before it's possibly destroyed forever.

An anti-coal seam gas mural on a building in Pilliga township

Green Left's Mat Ward was as pissed off as most people when Santos' coal seam gas project was approved in Narrabri, despite 98% of people opposing it. He decided to spend a few days cycling the area in the north-west of New South Wales before it's possibly destroyed forever.

Pilliiga township

Green Left's Mat Ward was as pissed off as most people when Santos' coal seam gas project was approved in Narrabri, despite 98% of people opposing it. He decided to spend a few days cycling the area in the north-west of New South Wales before it's possibly destroyed forever.

An anti-coal seam gas mural on a building in Pilliga township.

Green Left's Mat Ward was as pissed off as most people when Santos' coal seam gas project was approved in Narrabri, despite 98% of people opposing it. He decided to spend a few days cycling the area in the north-west of New South Wales before it's possibly destroyed forever.

The passing of the Greens-initiated motion for a Green New Deal in the Victorian Legislative Council is a significant step forward, writes Sue Bolton.

Perth protest against the Afghanistan war in 2010

Alex Bainbridge writes that the release of the report into Australian war crimes in Afghanistan should be shocking — but it isn't.

In arriving at a synthesis between ecosocialism and ecoanarchism, Ted Trainer argues that the kind of socialism he supports avoids domination, hierarchy, authoritarianism, centralisation and top-down power.

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