Culture

French economist Thomas Piketty became something of a global phenomenon when Capital in the Twenty-First Century topped The New York Times’ Best Seller list in 2014. He has now produced a follow-up work, Capital and Ideology, writes Neville Spencer

The mass protests erupting in the United States in response to the police killing of George Floyd have led to support from some unlikely allies, writes Jacob Andrewartha.

Here's a look back at May's political news and the best new albums that related to it.

You’ve probably heard The Ballad of 1891 about the Queensland shearers’ strike. You can probably sing Kev Carmody’s From Little Things Big Things Grow about the Gurindji Walk Off at Wave Hill in 1961. But do you know the story of the Jobs for Women campaign at the Wollongong steelworks in the 1980s? Check it out at the Sydney Film Festival, writes Karen Fletcher.

Canadian socialist and feminist Suzanne Weiss begins her recent memoir with these words by W B Yeats: “There are no strangers here, only friends you have not yet met.” More than just an epigram, they describe a practice of solidarity that saved Weiss from the Holocaust and later shaped her more than six decades of activity as a life-long socialist, writes James Clark.

During 1990s, the Chicago Bulls dominated US basketball, with Michael Jordan at the centre of the team. The Last Dance gives us a nostalgic look at the rise of that dynasty, writes Alex Salmon

Hugo Weaving and Andrew Luri experiencing the healing quality of music in Hearts and Bones

Hearts and Bones is a compassionate portrayal of the refugee experience that empowers and dignifies, without romanticising the trauma and struggle, writes Annolies Truman.

For a film that claims to be about breaking the environment/climate movement away from the tentacles of capitalist-funded NGOs, Planet of the Humans  fails to articulate a vision of what an alternative, people powered climate movement could look like, writes Zane Alcorn.

April 2020 political albums sleeves

Mat Ward takes a look back at April's political news and the best new albums that related to it.

“Heung gong jan, gaa jau!” (Hong Kongers, add oil) is a rallying cry that could be translated to mean “Go Hong Kongers!” according to Anthony Daripan, as he recounts the experience of Hong Kong protesters last year facing police tear gas. Alex Salmon takes a look at his detailed account of the protest movement that erupted in June last year.

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