Cuba

Cuba is only a few days away from ending its coronavirus quarantine. Except for Havana, all the other provinces are free of the contagion and have begun moving toward a new normality, writes Fernando Ravsberg.

Many people around the world have heard of Cuba's inspiring and unmatched international medical solidarity efforts in the COVID-19 pandemic, writes Peter Boyle. But how is Cuba faring in the struggle against the pandemic at home?

Cuban cartoonists confront COVID-19 with humour and a nasobuco (facemask).

Cuban medicine could treat thousands of coronavirus patients as production of a “flagship” drug known to combat the disease is set to increase significantly, writes Steve Sweeney.

Amid the mounting COVID-19 pandemic, capitalist governments around the world have clearly prioritised corporate welfare over public health. But Cuba has set an example of international solidarity in its response, writes Peter Boyle.

Cuba is the most sustainably developed country in the world, according to a new report launched on November 29.

The socialist island outperforms advanced capitalist countries including Britain and the United States, which has subjected Cuba to a punitive six-decades-long economic blockade.

Cuba still stands as a symbolic pole, reminding us that human society can be organised on the basis of solidarity, cooperation, and respect. This is a profound vision that stands clearly at odds with the individualist, profit-driven mantras of far-right leaders like Trump and Bolsonaro.

In 2008, the prestigious Council on Foreign Relations published a report titled US-Latin America Relations: A New Direction for a New Reality. Timed to influence the foreign policy agenda of the next US administration, the report asserted: “the era of the US as the dominant influence in Latin America is over.”

Then, at the Summit of the Americas the next year, then-president Barack Obama promised Latin American leaders a “new era” of “equal partnership” and “mutual respect”.

What is to be done about high temperatures, rising sea levels and increasingly powerful hurricanes? What can we do to be less vulnerable to climate change? Yisell Rodríguez Milán and Danae González Del Toro take a look at how socialist Cuba is addressing climate change.

Cuba’s “Project Life” action plan outlines eleven projects to help the island nation adapt to climate change.

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