Environment

Bolivia's World People's Summit on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth was radical, inspiring, uncompromising and exactly what was needed. Up to 30,000 people from six continents took part in the summit, which was held in the Bolivian city of Cochabamba from April 19 to 22. The huge oil spill from a BP rig in the Gulf of Mexico underscores the summit’s significance. About 800,000 litres of oil are spewing out a day. The company admits it may not be able to stop the leak for weeks — or even months.
The World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth held in April 19-22 in Cochabamba, adopted a People’s Agreement on tackling climate change. Some of its key points are listed below. Visit Pwccc.wordpress.com to read the full document, and other resolutions adopted by the summit. The People’s Agreement includes the following points:
After weeks of political wrangling and uncertainty since the March 20 state elections, a new government has been formed in Tasmania. For the first time in Australia’s history, the Greens will have ministry positions. The Labor Party and the Greens agreed to a “power sharing deal”, which offered a ministry for Greens leader Nick McKim and a cabinet secretary position for Greens MP Cassy O’Connor.
“Capitalism is the number one enemy of humanity”, Bolivian President Evo Morales said in his closing speech to the World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth held on April 19-22 in Cochabamba. “It turns everything into merchandise, it seeks continual expansion. The system needs to be changed.” More than 35,000 people attended the summit, organised by the Bolivian government in response to the challenge of climate change after rich nations refused to allow an agreement for serious action at the December United Nations climate summit in Copenhagen.

A coalition of community environmental groups has been trying to stop logging in the Mumbulla State Forest in the NSW far south east, with a blockade of about 90 people. The forest contains the last known koala colony between Canberra and Victoria.

The logging is being carried out by Forests NSW, a public trading enterprise under direct control of the NSW state government. Ninety-five percent of felled trees are to be processed at the Eden woodchipping mill, owned by South East Forest Exports (SEFE).

On March 4, the first IQ² debate was held in Melbourne on the topic “Should Australia embrace nuclear power?”.On March 4, the first IQ² debate was held in Melbourne on the topic "Should Australia embrace nuclear power?".

Arguing the pro-nuclear case, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation chair Ziggy Switzkowski and Erica Smyth, chair of uranium mining company Toro Energy were joined by NASA climate scientist James Hansen.

As the world economy spirals down into its deepest crisis since the great depression, the writings of Karl Marx have made a return to the top seller lists in bookstores. In his native Germany, the sales of Marx’s works have trebled.

Around 1500 Ku-ring-gai residents were drawn together on November 17 to stand against inappropriate over-development of their municipality, particularly the increasing density of housing. The rally, promoted by Friends of Lindfield, kicked off with folk songs before a variety of speakers took the podium.

Speakers highlighted the inadequate representation that they felt local council members are providing, and voiced their concerns about corruption in the council.

Just like the fight against James Price Point a decade ago, Woodside and BHP's Scarborough gas is not wanted or needed. In a case of history repeating itself, the WA community is showing its opposition to more fossil gas. That's why we will be outside Woodside's offices every other week, until they walk away from Scarborough gas. Come down in your lunch break and learn more about Woodside's climate wrecking activities each fortnight.

For over 30 years Friends of the Earth has been running Rad Tours to SA so people can experience first-hand the social and environmental impacts of the nuclear industry.

Film Screening of new film on Jack Mundey's life and politics.

Jack Mundey was part of a radical team that won the union leadership of the Builders Labourers Federation (BLF) in the 1960s.

After winning safety on the job, sick and accident pay, the BLF went on to fight apartheid, give solidarity to First Nations peoples, fight for jobs for women, for black and then green bans. Those bans saved many heritage and environmentally significant sites.

The Conservation Council of WA are proud to host our Annual Conference for 2021 - A Bold Vision for WA: Conservation, Climate and Communities.

Water is not for Sale! In the lead up to World Water Day on March 20, and in solidarity with river communities Walgett, Brewarrina and Bourke join us at Sydney Water offices in Parramatta to say:

Water is not for Sale! Water for Rivers and Communities!
Take Water off the Market, end Water Trading!
Stop big corporate pumping when rivers have low to medium flows!
Ban floodplain harvesting!

Location: Replants.com, 96 Wray Ave, Fremantle, WA 6160

"Water Is Life", a documentary about the fight by Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory to stop fracking on their land. Plus a film on fracking in the Kimberley and an update from Lock The Gate campaigner Simone van Hattem.

In the 1960s radical socialists led by Jack Mundy were elected leaders of the NSW Builders Labourers Federation. They not only won better pay and conditions for building workers, their radical environmental politics shook all of Australia.

To celebrate International Women's Day we will watch #StopAdani: A Mighty Force! and hear from and about women on the frontlines of the struggle to protect water and life from coal and coal seam gas mining.

At Kent House, 141 Faulkner St, Armidale, NSW 2350.

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