war on terror

British soldiers in Iraq

A secret memo published by Stop the War UK details an April 2002 meeting between Tony Blair and George W Bush concerning military intervention to topple Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, reports Kerry Smith.

Tony Blair has blood on his hands

Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair will receive a knighthood on June 13, but more than 1.2 million petitioners say he should be sent to The Hague as a war criminal, not honoured at Windsor Castle.

US military doctrine is about remaining the pre-eminent military power and ensuring that the world be organised in a way that is most conducive to its security and prosperity, writes William Briggs.

Detainees held in Camp X-Ray at the US Guantanamo Bay facility.

According to a new UN Human Rights Council report, the worst human rights violations on Cuban soil take place at the hands of United States agents at the Guantánamo Bay prison, reports Ian Ellis-Jones.

The first prisoners of the “War on Terror” — declared by US president George W Bush — began arriving at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, on January 11, 2002, writes Binoy Kampmark.

After the attack on the World Trade Centre on September 11, 2001, United States president George W Bush gained unlimited powers to fight “forever wars”, writes Malik Miah

The quick collapse of the puppet government in Afghanistan and its army should not come as a surprise given the imperialists' criminal record. Sue Bolton argues that Australia's war criminals need to be held to account.

Afghan Women’s Mission co-director Sonali Kolhatkar spoke with the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA) about the unfolding situation on the ground.

The withdrawal of combat troops from Afghanistan is a welcome development. But, as Alex Bainbridge argues, it doesn’t mean that the warmongers in Canberra and Washington have been defeated.

A new study has calculated that more than 37 million people have been displaced or forced to flee their homes during the 19 years of the United States war on terror, writes Rupen Savoulian.

March 19 marks 15 years since the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, and the US people have no idea of the enormity of the calamity the invasion unleashed.

The military intervention that the United States political and Pentagon establishment never talked about is suddenly in the news after a joint patrol comprising 12 US troops and 30 Nigerien soldiers was attacked by a small group thought to be an ISIS affiliate known as ISIS in the Greater Sahara (ISIS-GS).

The incident itself was little mentioned until US President Donald Trump – after two weeks of silence on the matter – offended the family of soldier La David Johnson in a characteristically insensitive condolence call to his widow Myeshia Johnson.

United States President Donald Trump announced that the US would continue the ongoing war in Afghanistan, which is already the longest war in US history, Democracy Now! reported on August 22.

The Pentagon is likely to deploy about 4000 more US troops to Afghanistan in the coming months. In recent months, the US has intensified its air war in Afghanistan. During June, the US carried out 389 airstrikes in Afghanistan — the highest monthly total in five years.

David Kilcullen operates in the post-structural, morally grey nether world that neoliberalism has created. Not quite a mercenary — but not much better — he slides between being an Australian soldier, a top-level civilian strategic thinking adviser to the US military, a “security consultant” and an academic.

Afghan anti-war activist and feminist Malalai Joya sent the solidarity message below to a protest organised by Sydney Stop the War Coalition against the visit of US Vice President Mike Pence to Australia on April 29.

Joya was elected to Afghanistan’s National Assembly of Afghanistan from 2005 until early 2007. She was dismissed from her seat for denouncing the presence of warlords and war criminals in the Afghan Parliament.

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