Issue 340

News

Reclaiming the night in rural Queensland ROCKHAMPTON — The Reclaim the Night march this year was a big success in this provincial central Queensland town. The march was supported by 250 people, an increase of 100 from last year. The growing
SA government stalls on extra staff in schools SA government stalls on extra staff in schools By Melanie Sjoberg Adelaide — City workers were bemused by the appearance of 700 cardboard cutouts on the lawns of Victoria Square, outside the
Action needed against Centrelink job threat, say workers By Jim McIlroy BRISBANE — Staff and community leaders have expressed outrage over reported plans by the federal government's social welfare delivery agency, Centrelink, to slash up to
By Nick Markin SYDNEY — In the midst of negotiations for a new enterprise agreement between the Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) and P&O's Container Terminals Australia Ltd (CTAL), management at Port Botany has abolished 34 crane chaser
This issue of Green Left Weekly is a little bit different. It contains the first issue of Resistance magazine, published by the socialist youth organisation, Resistance. The launch of Resistance as a regular feature in Green Left Weekly will
By Leo Wellin Following the public endorsement by telecommunications industry union officials of a Telstra enterprise agreement many workplace delegates consider rotten, union militants are preparing a "Vote No" campaign for the staff ballot on the
Surprises in Newcastle poll By Steve O'Brien NEWCASTLE — One Nation is casting a shadow over the November 21 Newcastle federal by-election. The Liberal candidate, Clive Jensen, bowed out of the contest and announced that he voted for Labor in a
Protests target Howard, ERA SYDNEY — About 150 protesters gathered outside the Town Hall here on November 6 to express their anger at the Jabiluka uranium mine. The rally and march through the city centre to the offices of Energy Resources of
Carr, cops and media bash ethnic community By Srini SYDNEY — The "drive-by shooting" of Lakemba police station in the city's south-west has led to a racist backlash against sections of Sydney's ethnic population. Tension has been rising since
By Sue Boland The Howard government is talking tough in a bid to exert maximum pressure on the senators with the softest positions on the GST — independents Mal Colston and Brian Harradine and the Australian Democrats — to try to get its tax
By Jenny Long SYDNEY — Ever since the Lakemba police station was shot up on November 1, the city's media have bombarded residents with about the "lethal cocktail" of "migrant crime". RANDA KATTAN, executive director of the Australian Arabic
Departing One Nation MP praises Labor's native title bill Departing One Nation MP praises Labor's native title bill By Graham Matthews BRISBANE — One Nation state MP Charles Rappolt resigned from parliament and One Nation on November 4.
By Bronwen Beechey ADELAIDE — As the South Australian Liberal government pushes ahead with its plan to privatise the Electricity Trust (ETSA), power industry workers are gearing up to ensure that they will not suffer. On October 27, 1000 ETSA
WA tries to restrict injured workers' rights By Ana Kailis At the behest of insurance companies and employers, the WA Liberal government is attempting to curtail severely injured workers' rights to sue their employers for negligence. The move has
Move defeated for public service campaign against sackings Move defeated for public service campaign against sackings By Chris Slee The tax section council of the Community and Public Sector Union (CPSU) met in Sydney from October 23 to 26.
By Stuart Martin CANBERRA — The Chief Minister's Department (CMD) is the first department under the Carnell Liberal government to use the new industrial laws introduced by the Howard government. ACT public servants who are already on agency
Great Barrier Reef threatened by giant oil project Great Barrier Reef threatened by giant oil project By Francesca Davis On October 29, Greenpeace activists entered the Stuart shale oil production plant in Queensland, immobilised key areas of
New BHP boss bad news for workers By Geoff Payne NEWCASTLE — The appointment of Paul Anderson as the new face at the top of Australia's largest company adds a new element of insecurity for BHP's workers. Anderson says he wants to "increase

World

Climate change conference opens in Buenos Aires By Francesca Davis On November 2, the fourth meeting on climate change since the Kyoto conference began in Buenos Aires, with more than 160 countries attending. The conference looks set to be
By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — The defence of human rights and the environment in Russia scored an important victory on October 29, when a St Petersburg judge rejected treason charges brought by security police against nuclear safety campaigner
Mumia Abu-Jamal's appeal denied Death row political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal's appeal for a new trial, which was before the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, was denied on October 30. The order was signed by Justice Ronald Castillo, who as district
Spain considers Basque talks The British Financial Times reported on November 4 that Spain's conservative Prime Minister José Maria Aznar had bent to pressure following the Basque regional elections, and given approval to government
By James Vassilopoulos During the recent 21-day public sector strike in Colombia, eight trade unionists were assassinated. The murderers were paramilitary units possibly linked to the conservative government of Andres Pastrana, elected in August.
By Anneli Tolvanen MANAGUA — November 2 is the Day of the Dead in Nicaragua, when the cemeteries fill with family members decorating the graves of their loved ones. The day could not have begun with more disturbing scenes of death. The worst
Truth Commission report shakes up politics By Norm Dixon The final report of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), released on October 29 by chairperson Archbishop Desmond Tutu, has presented a damning indictment of the
US farm children at risk from pesticides Children living on or near farms in the United States face disproportionately high exposure to dangerous pesticides, putting them at serious risk for adverse health effects, according to a new report by the
Cuba updates Trade fair opened Cuban President Fidel Castro inaugurated Havana's 16th International Trade Fair on November 1, calling on the International Monetary Fund to adjust its economic policies toward the Third World. The Cuban leader said

Culture

The Brandon Teena StoryDirected by Susan Muska and Greta OlafsdotterPride DivideDirected by Paris PoirierDistributed by Queer Screen, phone (02) 9332 4938 Review by Bronwen Beechey These recently made documentaries from the US, screened at the
Double dose of modern opera Trouble in TahitiBy Leonard BernsteinDirected by Lindy HumeLove BurnsBy Graeme KoehneLibretto by Louis NowraDirected by Neil ArmfieldCompany B Belvoir and OzOperaBelvoir St Theatre, SyndeyUntil December 13 Review by
The Bonnie and Clyde of Cork Disco PigsWritten by Enda WalshDirected by Brian KiernanPerformed by Kevin O'Leary and Orla FitzgeraldTouring Australia Review by Bronwen Beechey Described by a British critic as "like something dreamed up by Quentin
Musical revolutionary Loving VibrationRas Midas and the BridgeJML Music ProductionSend US$18 to PO Box 7504, Santa Cruz, CA 95061, USAE-mail <voiceluv@cruzio.com> Review by Norm Dixon Contrary to popular myth, left-wing reggae — in
Get Another GripBy Kaz CookeMelbourne: Text Publishing, 1998. 258 pp., $17.95 (pb) Review by Phil Shannon Earth scientists' monitoring instruments have been reporting a sudden increase in rumblings and disturbances in the Australian political
Flickerfest casts an eye on PNG SYDNEY — Flickerfest, Australia's international short film festival, is to host "Ways of Seeing — the Camera Eye and Papua New Guinea", a documentary festival and forum night. It will take place at the Bondi
No more an object Women of SubstanceBy Sue Jackson and Gael WallacePhotographs by Ponch HawkesAllen & Unwin, 1998. 232 pp., $24.95 Review by Mary Merkenich This is a delightful book — informative, inspiring and entertaining. Sue Jackson and
Art will not wank Preview by Natalie Woodlock ADELAIDE — On November 14, artists and activists will come together in a unique exploration of art as an agent for social change. This exhibition and performance night, titled Art for Social Change,
The male psyche, warts and all The Odd CoupleWritten by Neil SimonWith Ted Chicoteau and Peter CranitchNew Farm Nash Theatre, Brisbane Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 8pmUntil November 28 Review by Lynda Hansen The Odd Couple explores the

Editorial

An encouraging development This issue of Green Left Weekly contains an important and encouraging development: Resistance magazine, a new publication that will be incorporated in each issue of Green Left. Resistance magazine will be designed,

Resistance!

The founders of Resistance were part of the youth rebellion of the '60s. Inspired by the Cuban and Vietnamese people's fight for freedom, Australian activists formed a revolutionary youth organisation in 1967. From a small group of determined
The two high school walkouts against racism in July and August showed just how far some school authorities are prepared to go to repress students' activism: At Mt Clear Secondary College in Ballarat, after students had spent weeks raising money to
NATIONAL — In a triumph for truth and justice, on November 2 the ABC's Media Watch program gave its "Lizard of the Year" award to 2UE's Stan Zamanek for his rabid, foaming-at-the-mouth coverage of Resistance's high school walkouts against racism.
By Sean Healy Resistance has mapped out its plans for growing and strengthening after a very successful year. Resistance's National Council, meeting in Sydney on October 19, spent a full day planning the future, how it would make the most of its
You're looking at it. This is our latest initiative — four pages (and the back cover) in Green Left each week specifically covering issues and features of concern to young people, by and for young people. Here's what you can expect: features and
By Arrow Tong School is oppressive. There are no two ways about it. For one, school (and students) are supposed to be "apolitical" — and school authorities try to keep it that way. Political repression tries to keep us quiet whenever we do take a
By Dave Gosling and Nikki Ulasowski 1. Because the mine is racist. The traditional owners of the land, the Mirrar people, are totally opposed to the Jabiluka mine. They were pressured into agreeing to the Ranger uranium mine lease in 1979 by