Issue 1331

News

A well-attended Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras annual general meeting voted overwhelmingly against the exclusion of activist organisations, Rachel Evans reports.

Thousands marched peacefully through the streets of Sydney to mark Invasion Day on January 26. Peter Boyle reports.

“Nobody would want their children in there,” Josie Crawshaw told a 150-strong Invasion Day protest outside the Don Dale Youth Detention Centre. Stephen W Enciso reports.

Thousands of First Nations people and allies marked Invasion Day on Ngunnawal and Ngambri country, marching to the Aboriginal Tent Embassy outside Old Parliament House. Adam Trumper reports.

Melbourne rally for refugee rights. Photo: Jacob Andrewartha

Socialist Alliance has managed to remain a registered political party, able to run in the federal elections with its party name and logo. Alex Bainbridge reports.

Annual Invasion Day protests drew thousands of people, the young in particular, reports Kerry Smith

Miranda Korzy, who was elected as a Greens councillor to the Northern Beaches Council, will not be celebrating Australia Day. Rachel Evans reports.

Members and supporters of the Association for Human Rights in Bolivia celebrated Bolivia's Plurinational State Foundation Day. Federico Fuentes reports.

Protesters, including Traditional Owners, have begun a campaign to stop Santos expanding its operations in the Northern Territory. Naish Gawen reports.

British nuclear-powered attack submarines like these could soon be based in Australian ports

Peace activists in Australia warn that the latest round of military talks between Australia and Britain are ramping up the war drive against China, reports Pip Hinman.

Kurdish rally

Members of Sydney's Kurdish community rallied at Sydney Town Hall to protest escalating attacks on Kurds in Turkey, Iraq, Iran and Syria. Peter Boyle reports.

Analysis

Distinguished Kuku Yalanji woman Pat O’Shane is running for Socialist Alliance in the seat of Leichhardt. A retired barrister and a former New South Wales magistrate, she spoke to Alex Bainbridge about what fires her up and why she decided to contest the federal election.

Invasion Day in 1972, when the Tent Embassy was set up, dawned bright in New South Wales, writes Pat O'Shane.

The lack of meat on supermarket shelves under the latest wave of the pandemic is a story of poor working conditions in the meat processing plants. Ema Moolchand and Shelley Marshall report.

Labour shortages give unions a stronger bargaining position. Sue Bull argues they need to argue against racist and nationalistic tropes that migrant workers steal Australians’ jobs, while defending workplace safety, wages and conditions.

A nation that refuses to confront the truth that modern Australia was built on violent dispossession and genocide is incapable of addressing the legacies of invasion, argues Janet Parker.

The failure of governments to plan for the COVID-19 Omicron variant and their “let-it-rip” approach has left vulnerable people with less support than ever. Zoe O'Dea reports.

Suzanne James spoke to NSW Greens MP David Shoebridge about what can be achieved if progressives hold the balance of power in state or federal parliaments. 

Fred Moore spent his life fighting for the underprivileged. He was proud that unions played an important role in pushing for rights for First Nations peoples, was concerned about women's rights and was an internationalist. Robynne Murphy bids him farewell.

Not enough focus has been put on doctors and nurses’ warnings about the deterioration of WA's healthcare system that, as Polly Watkins writes, has been run down for years. 

World

Free Derry corner in 1969. Image: Wikimedia Commons

On January 30, 1972, British soldiers massacred 14 civilians — six of them teenagers. Stuart Munckton looks at the roots of the British crime and the ongoing struggle for justice 50 years later.

Rio Tinto proposed mine in Serbia

Rio Tinto's plan to mine lithium in Serbia has been scuttled in the wake of Novak Djokovic's deportation and against a backdrop of huge anti-mining protests and the country's upcoming elections in April, reports Binoy Kampmark.

Free Julian Assange mural in Melbourne

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange's legal team has been granted leave to appeal to Britain's Supreme Court against his extradition to the United States, reports Binoy Kampmark.

London protest on Invasion Day. Photo: Angela Christofilou

Activists in London gathered at Captain Cook's statue in solidarity with mass rallies and dawn services held to mark Invasion Day in Australian cities on January 26, reports Kerry Smith.

Crowds outside the Honduran National Congress

Leftist Libertad y Refundación (Libre) party candidate Xiomara Castro de Zelaya won November’s presidential elections in Honduras with 51% of the vote — the highest proportion of votes for a presidential candidate in Honduran history, reports Ben Radford.

Journalists protest in Puebla Mexico. Photo: Tamara Pearson

Last year, Mexico was named the second most dangerous country in the world for journalists, after Afghanistan. A recent wave of assassinations has sparked nationwide protest action, reports Tamara Pearson.

Green Left speaks to Socialism and Freedom Party (PSOL) leader Roberto Robaina about Jair Bolsonaro’s extreme right project, the upcoming elections and how Brazil might fit into the new wave of left governments in the region.

Thanks to manoeuvring by the United States, the prospects for peace and self determination for Western Sahara have suffered a serious setback, writes Vijay Prashad.

US 'lethal' aid to Ukraine. Photo: @USEmbassyKyiv/Twitter

The threat of war in Europe between Russia and a United States-sponsored client-state in Ukraine is real, writes William Briggs. The security of Europe and the world is under direct threat and we receive, as always, a skewed and distorted view of what is going on.

Donald Trump is aiming to take back the majority in the Senate and the House in November, aided by voter suppression, as stage one of his 2024 presidential re-election campaign, write Barry Sheppard and Malik Miah.

Culture

Australia-US defence alliance

The average Australian has been enveloped by the inevitability of the US alliance as if it were a natural result of our history and “shared” values, writes Roger Davies.

Book covers

Andrew Chuter reviews two books by Peter Norton that trace the rise and rise of the private car.

Kanak labourers in a Qld sugarcane plantation. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Alex Salmon reviews a new book by historian and author Graham Seal that documents how the British government shipped more than 376,000 men, women and children across the oceans to provide slave labour in its colonies.