Basics Card

The privately-run Indue Cashless Card has been scrapped, although some communities in the NT will still be forced to use a cashless debit card. Alex Salmon reports.

Labor’s move to scrap the Cashless Debit Card is welcomed, but it must also abandon the paternalistic Basics Card, which largely affects those living in the NT. Alex Salmon reports.

Say 'no' to the Cashless Debit Card, Brisbane Labour Day 2022

Labor has said it will work with local communities on better local solutions” to the cashless debit card, leaving it a little ambiguous. Alex Bainbridge argues that all income management needs to stop.

What will happen to the pernicious cashless debit card scheme after the election? Labor has promised to make the scheme voluntary and the Coalition claims not to have a plan to expand it. But can either be trusted? Alex Bainbridge and Vivien Miley report. 

The following is a statement issued by participants of the StandUp2017 conference that concluded with a rally in Mbantua (Alice Springs) on June 26.

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Rosalie Kunoth Monks: “You better believe it, when the Intervention first hit in 2007 community councils were decimated.”

Matthew Ryan: “Trying to get the government to listen to us, is like a brick wall.”

"Another bloody bogan. Shows she can't manage her money", the Coles cashier said as Sally left the store. It was Sally's first time using the Basics Card, and things were not off to a good start.
The controversial introduction of income management to Playford in northern Adelaide was the subject of a thought-provoking and at times emotional community meeting hosted by Socialist Alliance on June 13. A sizeable turnout of locals, including individuals from Anglicare, Uniting Care and the Playford City Council, discussed how this policy, to be “trialled” from July 1, will impact on the wellbeing of those on Centrelink payments and the broader community, and how people should respond.
Aboriginal workers in the government’s $672 million Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program (SIHIP) are working for what amounts to half the dole plus rations. However, these workers are still being recorded as contributing to SIHIP meeting its employment target, Crickey.com.au said. SIHIP is the housing project announced by the federal government in 2008. The project was to provide much needed housing for Aboriginal populations in remote areas of the Northern Territory.
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