Issue 170

News

Sydney fumes exceed limit SYDNEY — A study released by the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) has revealed that the amount of benzene (a carcinogen in petrol) over George Street in the central business district sometimes exceeds the
By Stephen Robson "It's excellent. It's the best outcome in the face of the government's intransigence", Greens (WA) Senator Christabel Chamarette told Green Left Weekly following the decision on November 28 to establish a Senate select
Scientist 'alarmed' over Hinchinbrook go-ahead By Bill Mason BRISBANE — The use of a recent scientific report to overturn objections to developer Keith Williams' controversial Port Hinchinbrook project was an abuse, an environmental
Rally to defend community services By Chris Spindler ADELAIDE — Protests over cutbacks by the state Liberal government continue as the December 10 rally to "Defend Community Services" nears. More than 100 parents and students
By Dick Nichols SYDNEY — Sydney's Leichhardt Oval was the scene on Saturday, December 3, of one of the angriest protest rallies in the city in the last 20 years. As the 747s howled overhead, around 15,000 inner city residents gathered to
Smelter closure to cost 1000 jobs By Liam Mitchell WOLLONGONG — Southern Copper Ltd (SCL) has announced that it will cease operations at its Wollongong smelter in January, laying off 400 workers from its own work force and possibly
Socialists to stand in Wollongong By Liam Mitchell WOLLONGONG — The Democratic Socialists have announced that they will stand Chris Pickering as candidate for the seat of Wollongong in the upcoming state elections. Pickering, a
By Pip Hinman SYDNEY — "Australians can be made to understand the problem with trading with Indonesia's genocidal generals", renowned author and film maker John Pilger told a 450-strong meeting here on December 2. "Trade is not the holy grail,
By Rebecca Collerson SYDNEY — A new bill, and proposed changes to others, as part of the NSW Liberal government's law and order campaign have been diluted following pressure from the public. However, police powers regarding young people and
East Timor exhibition visits Ipswich By Nick Everett BRISBANE — Community Aid Abroad's "East Timor 1942-1992" photo exhibition opened in Ipswich on December 3. The exhibition, on the Queensland leg of its tour, contains more than 100
Shearers oppose union sell-out By Dave Wright and Ray Fulcher BALLARAT — The breakaway Shearers and Rural Workers Union (SRWU) is angry over the proposed award restructuring deal the right-wing AWU-FIME is set to conclude with the
DITA SARI, the general secretary of the Centre for Indonesian Working Class Struggle (PPBI), is completing a visit to Australia to attend the Indian Ocean Trade Union Conference in Perth and to address several public meetings, including the December
Tenants' funding withdrawn By Alex Bainbridge MELBOURNE — Thirty people gathered outside the office of the Victorian minister for housing, Rob Knowles, on November 30 to protest against the withdrawal of government funding of the Public
By Janet Parker SYDNEY — The plague of aircraft noise generated by the opening of the third runway at Kingsford Smith airport is uniting affected communities in a powerful opposition — one that has NSW Labor politicians running for cover.
ADELAIDE — On November 26, 120 people attended a protest rally over the privatisation of Modbury Hospital. Speakers, led by local residents, called for an ongoing campaign to save the hospital, the most efficient in the state. Lea Stevens from the
The good, the bad and the gorgeous: Popular culture's romance with lesbianism Edited by Diane Hamer and Belinda Budge Harper Collins, 1994. 253 pp., $24.95 (pb) Reviewed by Kath Gelber With all the fuss about lesbians in popular culture

World

By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — Amid bitter protests from miners, teachers and other sections of organised labour, Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma has begun implementing a program of "reform" designed to wipe the last traces of socialism from the
On tour in Sydney and speaking at the PNG Forest Benefit gig at the Harbourside Brasserie on Sunday, December 4, is Father Robert Lak, a prominent radio personality and founder of the development and political activist organisation Doa Foundation. He
By Pip Hinman SYDNEY — For both Junilyn Pikacha, from the Solomon Islands Planned Parenthood Association, and Geraldine Maibani-Michie, from the Department of Community Medicine at the University of Papua New Guinea, women's rights are
By Robyn Marshall BRISBANE — Cuban environmentalist Luis Sanchez told a meeting here on November 25 that the most pressing problem facing Cuba since the fall of the Eastern bloc was the production of food. Sanchez is touring Australia as
HAVANA — The World Cuba Solidarity Meeting wound up on November 25, after five days of debates, speeches and the work of different commissions. The final declaration of this unprecedented event stated: "... we 3072 participants representing
By Renfrey Clarke MOSCOW — Even in a city which now has a reputation as one of the world's crime capitals, it can be easy at times to forget that crime exists. Newspapers might carry lists of the week's murder victims, but a reassuring piece
Rwanda inaugurated its new parliament during the last week of November. The parliament is a broad-based legislature similar to that outlined in the Arusha Peace Accord of 1993. The government is led by the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) but includes
By Pip Hinman KUALA LUMPUR — "In search of a just world order" was the title and theme of a three-day international conference held here from November 18. Sponsored by the non-government organisation the Jamahir Society for Culture and
Bougainville: cease-fire fails By Frank Enright The Bougainville Revolutionary Army (BRA) has declared an end to the cease-fire between itself and the Papua New Guinea Defence Forces signed in September before the abortive peace talks held
By Frank Enright The emperor has no clothes. The sham of the West's so-called peacekeeping operation in Bosnia has been finally stripped bare with the entry into the UN-designated "safe haven" of Bihac by Serb forces. Along the way, the Serbs

Culture

Three Colours: Red Directed by Krysztof Kieslowski Starring Irene Jacob, Jean-Louis Trintignant Reviewed by Vannessa Hearman and Karl Miller The trilogy Blue, White and Red deals with the themes of liberty, equality and fraternity,
A Greek-Latin collaboration By Vannessa Hearman MELBOURNE — Following last year's success of the performance of Pablo Neruda's Canto General, this year Canto Coro will be accompanied by the Australian Greek Choir to present Axion Esti.
By Chris Martin SYDNEY — "Yiribana", a word from the Eora language believed to translate as "this way", is the name of a new gallery of Aboriginal art which has opened at the Art Gallery of NSW. Promotional material claims it to be the
Three Colours: Red Directed by Krysztof Kieslowski Starring Irene Jacob, Jean-Louis Trintignant Reviewed by Vannessa Hearman and Karl Miller The trilogy Blue, White and Red deals with the themes of liberty, equality and fraternity,
Representations of the Intellectual: The 1993 Reith Lectures By Edward W. Said Vintage, 1994. 90 pp., $12.95 (pb) Styles of Radical Will By Susan Sontag Vintage, 1994. 274 pp., $12.95 (pb) Revolutionaries: Contemporary Essays By
By Ray Fulcher MELBOURNE — A fortnight prior to the state government's "Arts 21" package being unveiled on November 23, the Melbourne Workers Theatre had its funding cut by $20,000. Arts 21 is the Kennett government's policy supposedly
Pulp Fiction Written and directed by Quentin Tarantino Reviewed by Zanny Begg Pulp Fiction is an amoral film. It's a film full of violence. A young black boy's head is blown off in the back of a car. A boxer kills his opponent in the ring.
Sabbath Bloody Sabbath Nativity in Black: A tribute to Black Sabbath Various artists Columbia Records Reviewed by Nick Fredman Before Metallica, before Soundgarden, before Spinal Tap even, there was Black Sabbath. With the insipid and
Romeo of the Underworld By Venero Armanno Picador Australia, 1994 Reviewed by Kylie Hunt There's something savage and real about Romeo of the Underworld. Venero Armanno makes you take it seriously from the first word — stronzo. Or to
Tumbling Dice By Brian Toohey Port Melbourne: William Heinemann Australia 1994. 348 pp. $24.95 Reviewed by Allen Myers Brian Toohey is much better known as an investigator of Australia's intelligence services than as an economics writer,
A Critical View of Western Journalism and Scholarship on East Timor By Geoffrey Gunn (with Jefferson Lee) Journal of Contemporary Asia Publishers, 1994. 271 pp., $25 (pb) Available by postal order from PO Box 703, Leichhardt 2040 Reviewed by
Didgeridoo Concerto Didgeridoo Concerto Ellipsis Arts Reviewed by Francesca Davidson Didgeridoo Concerto is an impressive 51 minutes of solo didgeridoo playing by musician Mark Atkins — reputedly Australia's leading Aboriginal

Editorial

Tax the rich We've had the recession that we had to have and now, just when we thought it was safe to go out, Treasurer Willis, Prime Minister Keating and Reserve Bank governor Fraser are concurring with business economists on the tax increases