Issue 1350

News

Activists called on Prime Minister Anthony Albanese to “get on the phone” to the United States and British leaders to free Julian Assange. Jim McIlroy reports.

More than a dozen people blocked the entrance to the Nioa munitions company on June 16 ahead of a national day of action with Northern Territory First Nations communities. Alex Bainbridge reports.

The NSW Coalition budget on June 21 locks in a wage cut for public sector workers, brings in a new land tax and further entrenches the privatisation of transport, reports Jim McIlroy.

New South Wales public and Catholic school teachers will stage a historic joint 24–hour strike on June 30 over pay, staff shortages and a mounting workload. Jim McIlroy reports.

Opposition to the international swimming federation’s blanket ban on transgender and intersex women participating in elite swimming has been swift. Nova Sobieralski reports.

The NSW Police' storming of a private property has led to one person being charged with traffic offences and big questions about police intimidation and overreach. Rachel Evans reports.

A coalition of environment groups warn against the Victorian Parliament bringing in new anti-protest laws which would even stop Traditional Owners from protecting Country. Chloe DS reports.

Australians for War Powers Reform have called on Prime Minister Anthony Albanese to follow through on Labor’s promise to hold an inquiry into war powers reform. Pip Hinman reports. 

Refugee activists gathered on World Refugee Day to call for permanent protection for refugees and an end to the country’s racist and cruel migration policies. Andrea Bortoli reports.

Climate protesters held up placards and banners demanding immediate action on climate change as Labor MPs arrived to be sworn in. Paul Oboohov reports.

Protesters gathered around the country, in response to a call out from Yuendumu Elders, to demand police be prohibited from taking guns into remote First Nations communities and justice for Kumanjayi Walker. Isaac Nellist and Chloe DS report.

Hundreds marched through Sydney to demand justice for Kumanjayi Walker and the many other First Nations people killed in custody. Video by Peter Boyle.

Public housing residents and supporters joined a Defend Public Housing picket to call for an urgent build of more public housing. Isaac Nellist reports.

Analysis

The war in Ukraine has made an already critical food crisis worse. Fingers point to grain supply shortages, but the problem is far deeper and linked to the economic system that turns food into a profitable commodity, writes William Briggs.

The Barangaroo project and casino is a story of corruption and secrecy, motivated by profit, and widespread opposition from community groups. Ben Radford reports.

The energy crisis we didn’t need to have has put the question of a publicly-owned energy industry on the table again. Sue Bull argues that is the only way to keep good jobs and energy prices down. 

At the recent Bonn climate talks, the rulers of rich nations act like arsonists who, after lighting the fire, prevent anyone calling the fire brigade, writes Alex Bainbridge.

The reason a significant number of members are leaving the Australian Education Union is because it failed to wage a strong campaign for workload relief and fair salaries, argues Mary Merkenich.

Anti-poverty campaigners are calling on Anthony Albanese’s Labor government to scrap the controversial new Workforce Australia program, reports Isaac Nellist.

While Qantas services sank and 9000 lost their jobs, chief executive Alan Joyce engineered the biggest transfer of public money to a corporation in Australia’s history, reports Michael West.

Nearly one in 25 young people have a problem with gambling, and teenagers are four times more likely to develop gambling problems than adults. Darren Saffin reports.

The only shock about the British Home Secretary’s decision to extradite Julian Assange to the US was that it did not come sooner, writes Binoy Kampmark.

World

The landscape after the parliamentary election in Andalusia looks bleak. But, Dick Nichols argues, that hidden beneath the dark statistics, a seed of hope germinated.

Ecuador national strike

Defying the state of emergency, enduring brutal police and military repression, hundreds of thousands of Ecuadorians continue to remain on the streets against neoliberalism, reports Tanya Wadhwa.

Women’s Centre leader Padmini Weerasuriya discusses the unfolding Gota Go Gama popular uprising and women workers’ struggles in Sri Lanka.

Colombia's Historic Pact wins election

The victory of the Historic Pact is expected to bring an end to decades of conservative and neoliberal politics which have dominated Colombia, reports People's Dispatch.

Jean Luc Melenchon

The left, under the banner of the newly formed Popular Union (NUPES), grew from 64 MPs to around 155 in the second round of the French parliamentary elections on June 19, reports John Mullen.

Renowned political dissident, linguist and author Noam Chomsky recently spoke with Alternative Radio’s David Barsamian about the war in Ukraine.

Culture

Football

The FIFA World Cup, due to begin in Qatar in November, will be stained by one of the highest casualty rates amongst workers in the competition’s history, reports Binoy Kampmark.

The Barber Who Read History

When a young socialist activist asked Peter Boyle for some suggested reading on Australian labour history it led him to Rowan Cahill and Terry Irving's latest book.

Ecosocialist Bookshelf June

Climate & Capitalism editor Ian Angus presents seven new books on science, medicine and socialism.

Meltdown: Three Mile Island shows just how close the 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant came to being a calamity on the scale of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, writes Alex Salmon.

Indelible City, writes Alex Salmon, looks at the struggles of the people of Hong Kong to maintain their city’s identity while caught between British colonialism and Stalinist China.