First Nations

Government neglect is to blame for the COVID-19 crisis disproportionately affecting First Nations communities in regional New South Wales. Rachel Evans, Paul Oboohov, Coral Wynter report.

The federal government has failed to consult Ngemba elders about a new development at the Ngemba Fish Traps in Brewarrina. Rachel Evans and Gill Boehringer report.

Ian Ellis-Jones reports on how the link between Cuba’s world famous adult literacy campaign and First Nations literacy campaigns in Australia were revealed during a screening of the documentary Maestra in Sydney.

Solidarity between the Palestinian and First Nations' struggles was highlighted in Sydney, reports Isaac Nellist.

For the first time in three decades, the NSW school curriculum is undergoing a complete reform. Jason van Tol argues that it is important to note what is being omitted.

Murrumbidgee River. Photo: Tracey Carpenter

The ongoing injustices and dispossession of First Nations peoples can be seen in the devastating impact of stolen water rights. But, writes Tracey Carpenter, some changes have been won in Victoria.

Racism is not fundamentally about individual behaviour – although often that’s how people experience it. Lavanya Thavaraja argues that it is central to the institutions of Australian capitalism.

Paul Gregoire lays out the context to the massive and youthful Stop Black Deaths in Custody — Black Lives Matter protest that took over the centre of Warrang-Sydney.

The recent destruction of a major cultural heritage site, Juukan Gorge in Western Australia, was undertaken in the name of Rio Tinto shareholders' profit, writes Samuel Knight.

At the height of the fire crisis over the New Year an Aboriginal elder, who had evacuated from Lakes Entrance to Bairnsdale in Victoria, joined other evacuees in registering for emergency relief. But he was told by a St Vincent de Paul staffer that the agency had “helped enough of your people today”, given a $20 fuel voucher and told not to tell other Aboriginal people about it. The elder walked out, humiliated, and asked his niece to return the voucher.

Yamatji First Nation members gathered in front of Geraldton police station on September 18 to vent their outrage and grief over the death of 29-year-old sister Joyce Clark, who was shot dead the night before by a police officer on the outskirts of the town.

As a kid, the way I was taught about Indigenous people was terrible. For one thing, the understanding of the Indigenous economy and technology was non-existent.

I had this picture of people living in homes basically made of a bit of bark and maybe grass and sticks leaned up against a tree trunk. The impression was they spent their time wandering around and occasionally spearing a kangaroo or goanna for dinner.

Over the years I picked up bits and pieces of a more realistic and less insulting picture of Indigenous life, but it wasn’t really until I read Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe that it all fell into place such that I can maybe imagine in some detail how people lived.

I was privileged to be invited to observe a National Gathering of First Nations peoples on November 4–5 at the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in Canberra.

Representatives from many different clan groups from a large number of First Nations across the continent attended. It was a direct response to the events at Uluru earlier in the year, with regard to Constitutional Recognition. Its initial purpose being to discuss the formalisation of a process of recognition of each tribe’s sovereignty.

This article on 10 thought-provoking lyrics from Native rap artists in the US first appeared at . ***

There’s always a verse, hook, or rhyme that listeners hear and say – whoa, I wasn’t expecting that. But, regardless of its effect, we find ourselves singing along to it.

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