capitalism

John Bellamy Foster argues that understanding how the transmission of viruses between species occurs is crucial to grasping the full dimensions of the overall metabolic crisis affecting humanity.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews and other Labor leaders are feigning surprise at the revelations coming from the sting on right-wing power broker and sacked state minister Adem Somyurek. But this cynical internal process is not new for Labor, or the Liberals for that matter, says Sue Bolton.

French economist Thomas Piketty became something of a global phenomenon when Capital in the Twenty-First Century topped The New York Times’ Best Seller list in 2014. He has now produced a follow-up work, Capital and Ideology, writes Neville Spencer

While Greens MP Adam Bandt is pushing for a green new deal, Hans A Baer asks why doesn't he also push the Greens to stop being soft on capitalism?

Virulent infectious diseases, such as COVID-19, have been predicted by disease ecologists because they are the result of the destruction of the world’s natural and agricultural ecosystems, writes Alan Broughton.

“Normal” was so broken, we don't want to go back to that. But, as Sam Wainwright argues, we're going to have to build a movement strong enough to transform Australia’s economy.

As the cost of bailing out corporate Australia keeps rising, the calls to raise the regressive GST and cut taxes for the rich have already started. They have to be resisted, argues Peter Boyle.

The federal government plans to spend $130 billion for a wage subsidy, but Peter Boyle argues it is more a corporate survival subsidy.

Panic buying is a normal response in a dog-eat-dog system that is clearly failing to meet essential needs, argues Sue Bolton.

There are two positive things to come out of the horrific bushfire crisis ripping through our country: recognition of the connection between global warming and more frequent and intense bush fires; and the inspiring courage and generosity of volunteers and emergency service personnel to protect their communities, despite being hugely under-resourced.

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres delivered another about the climate emergency on December 2. He told the 197 country leaders assembled that global average levels of carbon dioxide have now gone over what used to be considered an “unthinkable global tipping point”.

Environmental destruction isn’t driven by human nature or mistaken ideas. It is an inevitable consequence of a system built on capital accumulation argues Climate & Capitalism editor Ian Angus.

The global Climate Strike was the largest climate protest in history — and could turn out to be a tipping point for radical action on climate change, writes Jim McIlroy.

The most farcical side of the parliamentary banter between the Coalition and Labor regarding politicians’ ties to Chinese billionaires and government “agents of foreign influence” is not the pot-calling-the-kettle-black nature of their posture. It is that both studiously avoid mentioning the elephant in the room — the deeply entrenched corporate corruption of parliament and the state apparatus, writes Peter Boyle.

The September 20 global Climate Strike is gaining unprecedented support, including from unlikely quarters, including tech companies, university administrations and even the big four banks, writes Pip Hinman.

The climate emergency is already impacting all our lives. As it gets worse, we will be affected by more catastrophic floods and storms, bushfires and droughts. Globally there will be less clean water and farmland available. It is a result of an economic system — capitalism — in which private companies’ profit-making is privileged over the real needs of communities and their environments.

Pages

Subscribe to capitalism