Margaret Gleeson

Farmers have lost an appeal to stop a coal mine extension in the Darling Downs, but they haven't given up.

Protest outside the Brisbane headquarters of Adani contractor GHD Engineering on August 1.

Federal government attempts to silence environmentalists can, in large part, be explained by the successes of the campaign that has stalled Indian mining giant Adani’s Carmichael coal mine from going ahead.

A Stop Adani protest in Brisbane on October 23.

Could Indian mining firm Adani’s Carmichael coal mine, in Central Queensland, become a stranded asset? A number of recent events indicate the answer could be “Yes”.

A rally against the Wallarah 2 coal mine in Wyong on October 26

Coast Environmental Alliance organiser Emma French told the rally: “We want to raise awareness of this coal mine that is only 5 minutes away from Wyong and 20 minutes from Gosford, and will create 28 years of non-stop destruction of our land, our air, our water and our children’s futures”.

Labor’s announcement that it supports declaring a climate emergency is no doubt directly related to the growing movement for climate action. Yet it is also clear that, for now, this remains little more than an empty gesture.

Lawyers for Climate Action Australia wants peak legal bodies to recognise the climate crisis and declare a “climate emergency in recognition of the need for urgent action”.

In spite of Adani Australia CEO Lucas Dow’s claim last year that the corporate energy giant did not require a cent, the company looks set to sign off on a secret royalty deal with the Queensland government.

Adani will receive a $900-million-seven-year low interest royalty capital subsidy on September 30. This will mean Queensland will not receive a royalty return from Adani’s mine for years.

The Australia Institute (TAI) released its latest annual Climate of the Nation 2019 report on September 10. The annual report, first produced by the Climate Institute and for the past two years by TAI, has been tracking attitudes on climate change for more than a decade.

The Queensland Labor government’s decision to enact new anti-protest laws to protect new coal and gas projects is a reminder of who the government believes it is in power to serve, writes Margaret Gleeson.

Lock the Gate Alliance has warned that a recently announced federal government review of current mining assessment regulation will further reduce regional communities’ ability to fight inappropriate and unwanted resource exploitation.

Federal resources minister Matt Canavan announced at the NSW Minerals Council conference on August 5 that the government had asked the Productivity Commission to hold a 12-month review into what he thinks is the over-regulation of the resources sector.

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