Rojava

War-torn Syria faces the danger of a potentially very severe COVID-19 crisis. But in the north and east of the country, the Autonomous Administration is working hard to stop the spread of the virus and save lives, writes Chris Slee.

The people of North and East Syria — a region commonly known as Rojava — are facing increased risk of contracting COVID-19 due to its rapid spread in neighbouring countries, writes Kerry Smith.

The region of Rojava in Northern Syria, which cares for millions of civilians with less money and resources than virtually any other state on the planet, is on the verge of a catastrophe, reports Syrian Democratic Times.

Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan met Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow on March 5, where they agreed on a plan for a ceasefire in Syria’s Idlib province, writes Chris Slee.

While Turkey and Greece have turned refugees away from their borders, Peter Boyle reports that the revolutionary Autonomous Administration of North and East Syria (better known as Rojava) has welcomed refugees from war-devastated Idlib province in Syria.

World Resistance Day for Rojava, Sydney, November 3.

Initially known as World Kobanê Day, the day was first observed in November 2014 as a day of international support for the resistance of the people of Kobanê in Rojava who defeated the extremist forces of Islamic State (ISIS).

More trade unions have come out in opposition to Turkey’s invasion of the Kurdish majority, northern region of Syria, commonly known as Rojava, while new solidarity groups have sprung up.

Sydney, October 20. Photo: Tony Iltis

Members of the Kurdish community and supporters held rallies across Australia on October 19 and 20 to demand Turkey end its invasion of Rojava, a predominately Kurdish region in north-eastern Syria.

Demonstrators celebrate the anniversary of the Rojava Revolution.
Events in Syria, particularly in the Kurdish-majority north-eastern region known as Rojava, have led to several debates on the left. Australians for Kurdistan's John Tully takes up some of these and calls for support to be given to Rojava's unfolding revolution.
A protest against Turkey's invasion of Rojava, in Melbourne on October 12.

If Prime Minister Scott Morrison is as concerned about refugees as he claims to be, then Australia should condemn Turkey's invasion of Syria and secure emergency aid for those being forced to flee the region.

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