JobKeeper

The significant numbers at the July 24 anti-lockdown protests are a symptom of the failure of federal and state governments to put the health and safety of communities before corporate profits, argues Rachel Evans.

The federal government has failed on vaccines, quarantine and adequate or timely income support. Alex Bainbridge and Sarah Hathway argue that for a lockdown to work, it is imperative workers have income support and stable housing.

The end of the JobKeeper program means that up to 500,000 jobs are at risk. Jim McIlroy argues that plenty of secure jobs could be created if there was a mass campaign to redirect public funds to expand the public sector.

The government is crowing about the economic recovery. But when the pandemic supplement is cut at the end of March, people will be trying to survive on $43 a day. Graham Mathews reports.

Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is very upbeat about the economy, despite an official unemployment rate of 6.6% and a growing wealth divide. Peter Boyle investigates.

The recession, we're told, is over. But, as Graham Matthews details, Australia’s unemployed and underemployed are about to face more pain as the COVID-19 subsidies are withdrawn.

About 330,000 people will be pushed into poverty when the coronavirus supplement is cut again on January 1, writes Peter Boyle.

The Australian Financial Review Rich List 2020 reveals that the pandemic and associated economic crisis hasn’t impacted the 1%. Jim McIlroy reports.

Tuesday’s budget is on everybody’s mind. Most people will be looking for whatever life buoys Treasury throws, writes Suzanne James.

Newcastle unionists and anti-poverty activists protested federal cuts to JobSeeker at a snap action outside Centrelink, reports Steve O'Brien.

Lessons need to be learned to stop a third and fourth wave coronavirus shutdown, says Jacob Andrewatha.

Young people already know about insecure work. Darren Saffin and Chloe DS argue that the federal government needs a plan for sustainable, permanent jobs and housing that is not prohibitive.

 

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg's economic restructure plans will not only fall way short of what's needed, Graham Matthews argues they are also designed to attack working people.

While a concerted campaign by unions and welfare groups has forced the federal government to extend the JobKeeper program and JobSeeker supplement, the cuts it has announced means the battle for jobs and welfare must continue, reports Jacob Andrewartha.

Rather than spending $270 billion on offensive weapons, Alex Bainbridge argues funding should go to permanently raising the JobSeeker rate.

Young people, who have only ever had insecure casual jobs, face a very precarious future, writes James Swift.

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