Bringing Them Home report

Calls to end the removal of Aboriginal children from their families were made at rallies around the country to mark Sorry Day and the beginning of Reconciliation Week. Alex Salmon and Pip Hinman report.

Stop Black deaths in custody

Gunnai Gunditjmara and Djab Wurrung independent Senator Lidia Thorpe has received crossbench backing for her call on Labor to implement the royal commission into Black deaths in custody’s recommendations. Isaac Nellist reports. 

Sam Wainwright told Alex Bainbridge while the official Yes and official No campaigns for the Voice to Parliament referendum are based on conservative agendas, the demoralisation that would flow from a No victory outweighs the limitations of the Voice.

This year's Closing the Gap report provides more damning evidence of the colonialist approach to First Nations people. Isaac Nellist reports.

On the 20th anniversary of Sorry Day, May 26, a day to remember the forced removal of First Nations' children from their families that became known as the Stolen Generations, a delegation of First Nations' grandmothers marched on Parliament House chanting "Bring our children home".

Rather than being a landmark for progress and reconciliation the delegation of Grandmothers said that 20 years on, the situation has only worsened.

Twenty years after the original Bringing Them Home report was released, Aboriginal children are still being taken from their parents — in greater numbers than before.

Commenting on the impact of Bringing Them Home — which documented evidence about the Stolen Generations of Aboriginal children — Murri elder Sam Watson told Green Left that “it is beyond dispute that Aboriginal children were removed in significant numbers”.

“Every single [Aboriginal] family was affected,” Watson said and this “dated back to the first years of European invasion”.