Bolivia

The protests and occupation of the United States Capitol are a small taste of the kind of brazenly undemocratic power grabs the authoritarian right has executed in countries like Bolivia, writes Denis Rogatyuk.

Oliver Vargas traveled with Evo Morales, as he made his triumphant return to Bolivia following his exile after last November’s US-backed coup.

Green Left speaks to Federico Fuentes, a contributor to Green Left on Latin American politics, about the overwhelming victory for the Movement Towards Socialism and the defeat of last year's right-wing coup in the recent elections in Bolivia.

Bolivians have overwhelmingly voted the left-wing Movement Toward Socialism (MAS) back into office in a resounding reversal of last year’s coup, writes Federico Fuentes.

Protesters gathered in front of the Opera House to denounce human rights violations and demand Bolivia’s October 18 elections be held under free and fair conditions, reports Federico Fuentes.

Just weeks out from the October 18 elections, Bolivia’s coup government is again in crisis after the departure of three ministers over an attempt to privatise an electricity company, writes Federico Fuentes.

Following the adoption of a law to guarantee elections before October 18, the Bolivian Workers Centre has voted to temporarily halt pro-democracy protests. But it has vowed to mobilise again if the coup regime does not abide by the deadline, writes Susan Price.

Protesters gathered in Sydney’s Botanical Gardens on August 16 to express solidarity with the people of Bolivia in their struggle against dictatorial repression and for democratic rights, report Jim McIlroy and Coral Wynter.

Following pressure from social movements, the Bolivian legislature has agreed to sign into law a proposal that make October 18 the absolute, "immovable" deadline for elections, writes Kerry Smith.

Weeks of mass protest in Bolivia is putting the United-States-backed coup government under pressure to hold elections without further delay, writes Marco Teruggi.

Bolivia’s use of its wealth to advance the interests of the people rather than corporations was an abomination to the United States, which egged on the coup that illegally overthrew the elected government in November last year, write Vijay Prashad and Alejandro Bejarano

Federico Fuentes compares how the left-wing government of Venezuela and the right-wing coup government of Bolivia are responding to the COVID-19 epidemic.

Given the exponentially rising death toll from COVID-19 and the devastating social and economic effects of brutal lockdowns, what could a humane and progressive response to the global pandemic look like?

Federico Fuentes outlines a detailed and comprehensive plan for tackling COVID-19 developed by Bolivia’s Movement Towards Socialism (MAS).

Bolivians will return to the polls on May 3, almost five months after former president Evo Morales was ousted in a coup. Having been declared the winner of the October 20 election, the leader of the Movement Towards Socialism (MAS) was forced to resign three weeks later after opposition protests denouncing fraud culminated in the police and military calling on Morales to step down.

Evo Morales was the first democratically elected Indigenous president of a nation that has the highest percentage of Indigenous people in all of South America. He gave people hope, and he made people believe Indigenous people can be leaders and teachers, and that we can be taken seriously, too. That’s why he is so precious to us.

Protests against the civic-military coup have been growing in strength across the country and security forces have responded with brutal repression.

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