John Pilger: Our only choice is stand and fight

Issue 
Tens of thousands of students protested in London on November 10. Photo: coalitionofresistance/Flickr

“Rise like lions after slumber/In unvanquishable number!/Shake your chains to earth, like dew/Which in sleep had fall’n on you/Ye are many —they are few.”

These days, the stirring lines of Percy Shelley’s “Mask of Anarchy” from 1819 may seem unattainable. I don’t think so.

Shelley was both a Romantic and political truth-teller. His words resonate now because only one political course is left to those who are disenfranchised and whose ruin is announced on a British government spreadsheet.

Born of the “never again” spirit of 1945, British social democracy has surrendered to an extreme political cult of money worship. This reached its apogee when £1 trillion of public money was handed unconditionally to corrupt banks by a Labour government whose leader, Gordon Brown, had previously described “financiers” as the nation’s “great example” and his personal “inspiration”.

This is not to say parliamentary politics is meaningless. It has one meaning now: the replacement of democracy with a business plan for every human activity, every dream, every decency, every hope, every child born.

The old myths of British rectitude, imperial in origin, provided false comfort while the Blair gang built the foundation of the present Conservative-Liberal Democrat “coalition”.

This is led by a former PR man for an asset stripper and by a bagman who will inherit his knighthood and the tax-shielded fortune of his father, the 17th Baronet of Ballintaylor. Prime Minister David Cameron and Chancellor George Osborne are essentially fossilised spivs who, in colonial times, would have been sent by their daddies to claim foreign terrain and plunder.



Today, they are claiming 21st-century Britain and imposing their vicious, antique ideology, albeit served as economic snake oil. Their designs have nothing to do with a “deficit crisis”.

A deficit of 10% is not remotely a crisis. When Britain was officially bankrupt at the end of World War II, the government built its greatest public institutions, such as the National Health Service and the arts edifices of London’s South Bank.

There is no economic rationale for the assault described cravenly by the BBC as a “public spending review”. The debt is exclusively the responsibility of those who incurred it, the super-rich and the gamblers.

However, that’s beside the point. What is happening in Britain is the seizure of an opportunity to destroy the tenuous humanity of the modern state.

It is a coup, a “shock doctrine” as applied to Pinochet’s Chile in the 1970s and Boris Yeltsin’s Russia in the 1990s.

In Britain, there is no need for tanks in the streets. In its managerial indifference to the freedoms it is said to hold dear, bourgeois Britain has allowed parliament to create a surveillance state with 3000 new criminal offences and laws: more than for the whole of the previous century.

Powers of arrest and detention have never been greater. The police have the impunity to kill; and asylum-seekers can be “restrained” to death on commercial flights.

With playwright Harold Pinter gone, no acclaimed writer or artist dare depart from their well-remunerated vanity. With so much in need of saying, they have nothing to say.

Liberalism, the vainest ideology, has hauled up its ladder. The chief opportunist, Nick Clegg, gave no electoral hint of his odious faction’s compliance with the dismantling of much of British postwar society.

The announced theft of £83 billion in jobs and services matches almost exactly the amount of tax legally avoided by piratical corporations. Without fanfare, the super-rich have been assured they can dodge up to £40 billion in tax payments in the secrecy of Swiss banks.

The day this was sewn up, Osborne attacked those who “cheat” the welfare system. He omitted the real amount lost, a minuscule £500 million, and that £10.5 billion in benefit payments was not claimed at all. Labour is his silent partner.

The propaganda arm in the press and broadcasting dutifully presents this as unfortunate but necessary. Mark how the firefighters’ strike is “covered”.

On October 26 on Channel 4 News, following an item that portrayed modest, courageous people as basically reckless, presenter Jon Snow demanded the leaders of the London Fire Authority and the Fire Brigades Union go straight from the studio and “mediate” now, this minute.

“I'll get the taxis!” he declared. Forget the thousands of jobs that are to be eliminated from the fire service and the public danger beyond Bonfire Night; knock their jolly heads together.

“Good stuff!” said the presenter.

British filmmaker Ken Loach’s 1983 documentary series Questions of Leadership opens with a sequence of earnest young trade unionists on platforms, exhorting the masses. They are then shown older, florid, self-satisfied and finally adorned in the ermine of the House of Lords.

Once, at a Durham Miners’ Gala, I asked Tony Woodley, now joint general secretary of Unite, “Isn’t the problem the clockwork collaboration of the union leadership?”

He almost agreed, implying that the rise of bloods like himself would change that. The British Airways cabin crew strike, over which Woodley presides, is said to have made gains.

Has it? And why haven’t the unions risen against totalitarian laws that place free trade unionism in a vice?

The BA workers, the firefighters, the council workers, the post office workers, the National Health Service workers, the London Underground staff, the teachers, the lecturers, the students can more than match the French if they are resolute and imaginative, forging, with the wider social justice movement — potentially the greatest popular resistance ever.

Look at the web; listen to the public’s support at fire stations. There is no other way now.

Direct action. Civil disobedience. Unerring. Read Shelley and do it.

[John Pilger’s articles can be read at johnpilger.com]

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