Britain

The looming economic crisis is serving to exacerbate tensions and competition between different nation states and blocs, writes Lindsey German.

To understand why Britain has fared so badly in the COVID-19 pandemic, it is essential to appreciate the neoliberal reforms which have steadily mutated its National Health Service over decades, write Bob Gill and Sarah Gangoli

The latest Stockholm International Peace Research Institute figures reveal a world in which arms spending is rising across most, if not all regions, writes Chris Nineham.

Death is touching everyone in Britain with fatalities from COVID-19 running at nearly a thousand a day, writes Derek Wall. So why is Prime Minister Boris Johnson still popular?

 

World-renowned journalist and filmmaker John Pilger speaks to author TJ Coles about the coronavirus crisis in the context of propaganda, imperialism, and human rights.

Major threats to public health, living standards and political freedoms underpin Prime Minister Boris Johnson's response to COVID-19, write Neil Faulkner and Phil Hearse.

Environmental campaigners are calling for urgent action to cut pollution in the Arctic from the global shipping industry, writes Kerry Smith.

The truth is that Australia could have rescued Julian Assange and can still rescue him, writes John Pilger.

When conversing with commoners, members of the British Royal Family are instructed to always ask the question "And what do you do?" For, after all, this gives the working class something to talk about – their job.

But Phil Shannon says it is high time the question was returned in kind by asking of the royals: "And what do you do?"

British politics continues to be chaotic and uncertain. This might appear a surprising judgement, considering that: Boris Johnson’s government has a majority of 80 seats, the first time since the 1980s that the Conservatives have been able to rule without serious parliamentary challenge; and Britain left the European Union on January 31, apparently ending a saga that split first the Conservative Party and then the entire country.

Yet, beneath the surface, politics remains in flux, argues Derek Wall.

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