LGBTIQ

Protesters marched through Melbourne on February 9 against a proposed religious discrimination bill that, if passed, would increase the ability of religious institutions and individuals to discriminate, writes Kerry Smith.

Alex Bainbridge reports more than 400 people marched through the streets of Brisbane on February 1 against Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s religious discrimnation bill.

Perth Pride assembled its biggest parade to date on November 30, with 115 floats. But many in the LGBTIQ community were unhappy that a large number belonged to corporate sponsors and police while smaller community floats were squeezed out.

The struggle for LGBTI rights continues in WA under the banner of Rainbow Rebellion.

A rally against the proposed religious exemptions bill was held in Melbourne on August 31.

The bill would enshrine the right of religious institutions to discriminate against LGBTI people, among other attacks on civil and political rights.

LGBTI activists have slammed the federal Coalition government’s draft religious discrimination bill and vowed to step up protests.

A bill to enable trans and gender diverse adults and children to obtain birth certificates that record their self-identified sex — male, female or a descriptor of their choice — looks set to pass the Victorian parliament, despite opposition from conservatives and trans-exclusionary radical feminists.

Hundreds of LGBTI activists rallied against the federal government’s religious exemptions bill, in Sydney on August 3.

The bill would enshrine the right of religious organisations to discriminate against members of the LGBTI community.

It is hard to conceive that in 2019 a reactionary minority within government are legislating for religious protection laws that strengthen the rights of religious institutions to discriminate against members of the community based on sexuality.

One of the sectors hardest hit by Venezuela's economic crisis is the nation’s LGBTI community. Lacking access to life-saving medicines and denied certain rights, activists say there is still much to be done within the revolution, writes Federico Fuentes.

If you like boundary-challenging cinema, this is for you.

When the United States football (soccer) team beat France in the Women’s World Cup quarter final, it was two goals by US player Meagan Rapinoe that got them over the line. If the US go all the way to win the cup on July 7, Rapinoe will likely have played a decisive role. But the attacker had already made headlines, refusing to sing the national anthem and telling the media that, should the US win the cup, she will not “go to the fucking White House”. Lindsay Gibbs looks at the furore created by Rapinoe’s stances.

This book exposes the extraordinary scale of the double lives to be found among the most powerful section of the Catholic hierarchy.

Could you be described as being “non-faith”? The newly re-elected Coalition government has a law in mind for you, writes Barry Healy.

The highest decision-making body in the world of athletics has rendered a judgment that can only be described as both cruel and unusual, writes Dave Zirin.

The Boycott Brunei in Australia group have said the campaign against Brunei’s death-by-stoning penalty for “crimes” such as homosexuality, adultery, blasphemy and apostasy will continue despite Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah’s May 6 statement that he had reconsidered the April 3 order.

The activists welcomed the Sultan’s comments, but noted that the Syrariah Penal Code Order (SPCO) was only suspended, not cancelled, saying life for those who breached government diktats remained grim.

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