Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

Australian scientists, led by Tim Flannery, want federal environment minister Tanya Plibersek to heed the science and ensure all assessments of new gas and coal projects are evidence-based. Pip Hinman reports.

The new IPCC report is upbeat about the possibilities to keep global warming at bay. Markela Panegyres argues there is no doubt that leaving fossil fuels in the ground is the bottom line.

There was a dangerous underestimation of the scale of the climate crisis we face at COP26, argues David Spratt. Targets for 2025 and 2030 need to be the focus.

Climate expert, Australian National University emeritus professor and Climate Council member Will Steffen speaks to Green Left about climate science and politics in the lead up to the COP26 United Nations climate summit in Glasgow.

Scott Morrison is still clinging to a weak emission reduction target of 26–28%, set six years ago. At the current rate, we won't reach net zero climate pollution until 2170, argues Jessie de Waal.

Activists were treated to an early-morning raid by an anti-terrorist outift for chalking a protest sign against oil and gas giant Woodside Energy, reports Chris Jenkins.

 

The IPCC's latest report should be a wake-up call to governments everywhere, but it's going to take more than science to force action by the biggest global emitters, writes Barry Sheppard.

Warming is already set on course to reach dangerous levels. But, if we do next to nothing — the course we are on — it could get a lot worse, writes Peter Boyle.

UN Secretary General António Guterres wants only those countries that can show “concrete, realistic plans” for reducing their carbon emissions to come the the UN climate summit in September. But you can be sure the recalcitrants, such as Australia, will be there.

Despite overwhelming evidence that the world has already passed certain tipping points, setting off large and unpredictable changes in the climate, why are governments still refusing to act on the scale and pace required, asks Pip Hinman?

The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), released on October 8, has called for zero net carbon dioxide emissions by 2050 as the only way to ensure runaway climate change is avoided. 

Global warming of 1.5°C is imminent, likely in just a decade from now. David Spratt reviews several recent studies that point to this alarming conclusion.

So how does hitting warming of 1.5°C one decade from now square with the 2015 Paris Agreement’s goal of “holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C”?

In two words, it doesn’t.

The news that a trillion ton piece of ice just broke off from the Larsen-C ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula is a reminder that global warming is real and dangerous.

While climate scientists say this had been expected, they also say it is connected to global warming. As ice shelves help keep land ice in place, when one breaks it allows land ice to slip into the ocean and drastically contribute to sea level rise.

For years climate scientists have been warning that time is fast running out to stop the worst effects of global warming.

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