Tamara Pearson

Circulating intimate images — real or fake — over the internet to attack a woman's credibility, shame her or silence her, is one of the various types of online violence against women that the Mexican government will likely formalise as a crime in coming months, writes Tamara Pearson from Puebla.

The United States is continuing to muscle the governments of Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala to stop the flow of refugees across its border.

Many migrants are fleeing the consequences of US political intervention and economic policy in the region. They choose to travel in “caravans” for safety.

Immigration officers have gone on the offensive against the caravans, writes Tamara Pearson.

This year has been the most violent year on record for Mexico, with almost 26,000 intentional homicides between January and September.

A sophisticated greenwashing industry has emerged over the past few decades to not just mask the environmental destruction of corporations while blaming consumers, but to also present the climate crisis as a neutral and natural disaster, disconnected from a system of inequality. In fact, the climate crisis shows the wrong people are running the world, writes Tamara Pearson.

We see and judge women based on the perspective of super rich white men who also tend to own the beauty competitions and the cosmetic companies, writes Tamara Pearson.

Social media companies are putting profits before children, policymakers in Britain are arguing.

Last week, British minister for mental health and suicide prevention Jackie Doyle-Price called for Youtube, Facebook and Instagram to be treated like publishers that are responsible for the content on their platforms following the suicide of British teenager Molly Russell, who was exposed to graphic images on Instagram and Pinterest.

United States President Donald Trump has resorted to racist comments and extreme measures in response to a procession of refugees and migrants heading towards the US.

In mid-October, thousands of Hondurans left for a journey of many weeks through Guatemala and Mexico to the US. At its peak, the procession of refugees and migrants has included more than 7000 people fleeing unemployment, poverty and gang violence.

Mexico’s incoming president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO), wants to work with US president Trump to reduce migration and tighten borders. But, Tamara Pearson writes from Puebla, his approach doesn’t address key humanitarian issues.

When it comes to immigration and refugees, Mexico’s progressive president elect, AMLO, has more in common with US President Donald Trump than you’d expect.

While many in Mexico are distracted by World Cup matches and the upcoming presidential elections, something big and strange has been going on under the radar.

Migrants and refugees staying in a refuge in Mexico City have been subjected to verbal and physical attacks recently.

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