Hans Baer

Ecosocialists and ecoanarchists share an anti-capitalist stance, both viewing capitalism as the root of numerous social and environmental problems, writes Hans Baer.

Despite the failure of previous efforts to create socialist systems, ecosocialism remains a visionary alternative, writes Hans Baer.

Ecosocialists and ecoanarchists need to come up with strategies to transcend the problems and avert catastrophic anthropogenic climate change, argues Hans Baer.

We've being advised by governments and health experts to engage in social distancing during the pandemic. But, as Hans Baer points out, this advice is not being followed by airline industry bosses, nor are they being penalised.

Climate scientists and other observers often refer to various regions, such as the Arctic, low-lying islands, the Andes and Bangladesh, inhabited by Indigenous and peasant peoples as the canaries in the coal mine when it comes to the adverse impacts of anthropogenic climate change. But Australia is shaping up as one the canaries, writes Hans Baer.

There are no easy fixes, but to succeed, climate activists must build a broader movement to challenge and transcend global capitalism, writes Hans Baer.

Climate Justice: Hope, Resilience, and the Fight for a Sustainable Future
By Mary Robinson
Bloomsbury Publishing, 2018

Mary Robinson, the former president of Ireland, is undoubtedly sincere in her determination to fight climate change and “putting people at the heart of the solution”. Unfortunately, her new book shows that sincerity is not enough.

Breakthrough 2014, National Climate Restoration Forum, held over June 21 to 22 in Melbourne, brought together scientists, economists, engineers, business leaders and climate activists. In some regards, the forum represented an important step forward for the Australian climate movement. It highlighted the urgent need to respond to the climate crisis and discussed the possibility of restoring a reasonably safe climate in which human civilisation could continue.
The “Switch off Hazelwood, Switch on Renewable Energy” protest targeted Australia’s dirtiest coal-fired power station, in Victoria’s Latrobe Valley, on October 10. It was successful but muted in contrast to its predecessor in 2009. The mood was no less festive, but this year, there was no climate camp, no mass actions and no arrests.
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