Indigenous

A media conference in Geraldton, Western Australia,  on October 2.

Social justice workers and local First Nations community members spoke out about the dire need for action in the Yamatji region, at a media conference in Geraldton, Western Australia, on October 2.

Family members of three Aboriginal children murdered in Bowraville on the mid north coast of NSW between 1990 and 1991, together with Black Lives Matter supporters, marched through Sydney CBD on September 29 to demand that NSW Parliament change the law so that a new trial can be held.

No one ever wishes to witness a 17-year-old boy impaled on an iron fence. “A freak accident,” the coroner declared, exempting NSW police who denied chasing TJ Hickey in 2004.

Yamatji First Nation members gathered in front of Geraldton police station on September 18 to vent their outrage and grief over the death of 29-year-old sister Joyce Clark, who was shot dead the night before by a police officer on the outskirts of the town.

Tanya Louise Day was a strong Yorta Yorta woman who stood up for Aboriginal families whose loved ones had died in prison or police custody. She died from head injuries sustained in Castlemaine police station, in regional Victoria, on December 22, 2017.

Gill Boehringer, an honorary senior research fellow at Macquarie University, has been studying the Murray-Darling Basin crisis and believes that the New South Wales government’s reluctance to assist affected Indigenous communities is connected to their dispossession, discrimination and exploitation.

More than 1000 people rallied in Melbourne on September 10 in solidarity with the Djab Wurrung people fighting to defend a sacred songline and trees from being destroyed by the Victorian state government.

The protesters demanded the government halt its plan to demolish the trees.

Speakers denounced ongoing colonisation and said the treatment of the Djab Wurrung was just the latest in a long line of attacks against Indigenous people by the state government. 

A red alert was issued by the Djab Wurrung Heritage Protection Embassy on September 11 after police and VicRoad workers arrived near the protest camp sites set up by Traditional Owners to protect sacred trees from a $672 million highway duplication project in south-western Victoria.

The struggle of the Djab Wurrung people to protect their sacred lands from a proposed duplication of the Western Highway in south-western Victoria, continues to garner support. 

On September 10, dozens of academics and researchers released the following open letter calling on Victorian premier Daniel Andrews to intervene to save the sacred Djab Wurrung trees.

Queensland’s Labor government has secretly extinguished Wangan and Jagalingou native title rights over the Galilee Basin in its latest act of fawning support for Indian mining giant Adani.

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