Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA)

One by one, Australian unions are joining the global call for a ceasefire, placing pressure on Labor to stand on the right side of history. Kerry Smith reports.

Journalists and others have accused the ABC of downplaying the death of Gaza-based freelance journalist Roshdi Sarraj, who was killed by an Israeli airstrike. Elizabeth Bantas reports.

Adam Portelli from the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance takes issue with a Green Left article on the MEAA supporting media accreditation at protests.

Victoria Police has introduced new rules for journalists covering protests: they are now required to provide media identification to the police. Jacob Andrewartha reports.

Following the dropping of charges against ABC reporter Dan Oakes, Jim McIlroy reports on the media union's campaign to reform laws that criminalise journalism.

A showdown is looming in Australia between corporate media giants, with the federal government keen to appear as if it is taking a stand for media diversity. Jacob Andrewartha and Viv Miley explain.

The Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance has called for an immediate end to the investigation and possible prosecution of ABC journalist Dan Oakes, reports Jim McIlroy.

Unions representing staff at the ABC have condemned the federal government’s funding cut to the national broadcaster, writes Jim McIlroy.

Musician Oliver Simpson explains how hard COVID-19 has hit the arts industry, with its workforce largely comprised of freelancers and casual workers.

Angry Bananas in Pajamas on placards at rally against cuts

Unions have condemned the federal government's decision to cut a further $84 million from funding for the ABC in the federal budget announced on May 8.

The budget confirmed the government has frozen the indexation of ABC funding to effectively cut that amount over three years. These latest cuts come on top of the $254 million the Coalition government has already removed from the ABC's revenue since 2014.

The journalists’ union and legal organisations have warned that the federal Coalition government’s latest amendments to the Criminal Code Act 1995 would make it difficult, if not impossible, to report on what the government does behind closed doors.

More than 20 workers who were paid nothing to work in customer service roles at the Melbourne Grand Prix will receive back-pay.

Before the race, labour hire firm Adecco offered casual workers a “volunteer opportunity” that involved pre-race training and three full days’ work in customer service, all unpaid.