Black Lives Matter

Close to 200,000 people took to the streets across Australia for Black Lives Matter–Stop Black Deaths in Custody rallies on June 6-7, reports Zebedee Parkes.

Between 300-350 people attended a solidarity action in Katoomba, reports Lisa Macdonald.

The huge size of the Black Lives Matter protests across Australia on June 6 took everyone by surprise, reports Pip Hinman.

Actions in solidarity with those protesting in the United States against the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police will be held across Australia this weekend. The protests will also be demanding an end to Black deaths in custody in Australia, reports Kerry Smith.

In response to the murder of George Floyd by white police officers in Minneapolis, Minnesota, protests have erupted across the United States. Protesters took to the streets of New York City on May 31. These images were captured by Edward Leavy.

President Donald Trump held a Rose Garden gathering of mainly white male staffers on June 1 to announce he had invoked the rarely used Insurrection Act of 1807, writes Malik Miah. Trump said if state governors do not “dominate” protesters with force he would do so.

Blood and destruction are on the hands of the cops and the criminal justice system, writes Malik Miah, as an emboldened civil protest movement sweeps the United States.

Rapper, producer, film maker and socialist activist Boots Riley took to Twitter to outline why he will vote for the first time ever this year, and why he will be voting for democratic socialist presidential nominee Bernie Sanders.

Erica Garner, Black Lives Matter activist and daughter of African American victim of police murder Eric Garner, died on December 30 aged 27.

The proximate cause of death was a heart attack, extremely rare in one so young. The underlying cause was the trauma-induced stress (PTSD) she and her family suffered because of Eric’s murder in 2014, the exoneration of the killer cops, and the callous way the Garner family was treated by city authorities, including Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Every year, the Sydney Peace Foundation, a not-for-profit organisation partnered with the University of Sydney, presents the Sydney Peace Prize to activists fighting for positive social or environmental change.

The prize, which includes a $500,000 award, provides a platform for the activists to increase their reach and spread awareness for their causes. It has been presented annually since 1998 and is a valuable form of recognition of non-violent, influential activism. Last year’s award recipient was author and environmental activist, Naomi Klein. 

One year ago, Colin Kaepernick, then-quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers National Football League team, refused to stand for the US national anthem, famously kneeling instead. He was alone in his protest.

Over the weekend of September 23-24, tens of millions of football fans watched on TV as 200 mostly Black players knelt or raised their fists while the national anthem was sung. The rest of their teams stood in solidarity with their right to protest, arm-in-arm. In some cases, entire teams stayed in the locker room while the anthem played.

Thousands of protesters flooded the streets of Phoenix, Arizona when US President Donald Trump held a campaign rally on August 22, the first since his administration was engulfed by mass outrage following his remarks about the white supremacist riot in Charlottesville, Virginia, that included a far-right terrorist attack that left one peaceful protester dead.

Tens of thousands of people mobilized in Boston on August 19 in a magnificent display of solidarity against a rally that far-right and neo-Nazi forces had been organising for weeks.

Defying sweltering summer heat and humidity, thousands marched and chanted their way through the streets of Boston.

About 15,000 took part in a two-mile march from Roxbury Crossing to Boston Common, where the white supremacists were gathering. But by the time the march arrived, the two-dozen or so fascists had already packed up and left, with the help of a heavy police escort.

Appearing before a backdrop of smiling uniformed police officers on July 28, US President Donald Trump encouraged the brutalisers in blue to be more abusive and violent toward people they arrest in a speech given at Suffolk County Community College on New York’s Long Island.

It is important to note that while the vitriolic right-wing government opposition is concentrated among the white and economically elite elements of the population, the barrios, shanty towns and rural areas that are home to the poor, Indigenous communities and the Afro-Venezuelans have not erupted into protest for the most part because they support the government. In order to understand the roots of the elite opposition's hate and racism toward Black and Indigenous government supporters, one has to understand the history of the presidency that preceded Maduro's – that of Hugo Chavez.

“Now we’re judging people by their religion — trying to keep Muslims out,” said Stan Van Gundy, head coach of the US National Basketball Association (NBA) team Detroit Piston in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order banning immigration and refugees from seven predominantly Muslim nations.

“We’re getting back to the days of putting the Japanese in relocation camps, of Hitler registering the Jews. That’s where we’re heading.”

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