apartheid Israel

In response to Israel’s intention to annex up to 30% of the West Bank, respect for truth by all the parties involved, Israeli, Palestinian, United States, European and Australian, has been replaced by calculations about the benefits of deceit, writes Stuart Rees.

Israel and the Gulf states are pushing towards a normalisation of ties, entrenching cooperative measures that go back decades. By solidifying relations with the Gulf monarchies, writes Rupen Savoulian, Tel Aviv aims to isolate the Palestinians, score diplomatic and economic victories, and formalise an anti-Iranian alliance.

Critics of Trump’s Middle East “Peace Plan” in the capitalist media claim he has given Israel everything it wants. Trump says he is just being realistic, recognising the reality on the ground.

Barry Sheppard explains that Trump is right – he has given Israel nothing it did not already have, except United States official recognition and approval of that reality.

After much anticipation and with great ceremony, on January 28 United States President Donald Trump presented his plan for Middle East peace, writes Omar Karmi.

While the Nakba began with the expulsion of Palestinians from their villages and the destruction of those villages, it continues with sniper attacks on Palestinians in Gaza, encroachment of illegal settlements across the West Bank and extreme limitations placed on Palestinians' movements within and between towns, courtesy of IDF-staffed checkpoints, writes Lisa Gleeson.

Protesters gathered outside SBS’ Artarmon office on April 27 to urge the multicultural broadcaster to boycott Eurovision 2019, which will be held in Israel.

Palestinians will gather to commemorate Land Day on March 30. Last year, Land Day marked the beginning of the Great March of Return weekly protests in Gaza.

Land Day has its origins in 1976 when Israeli authorities conducted a brazen, large-scale theft of Palestinian land on behalf of settlers. Palestinians responded with a general strike and protests.

Gaza’s fuel crisis remained unresolved a week after a United Nations humanitarian official warned on August 8 that hospitals and water sanitation facilities would soon shut down as a result.

There is plenty of evidence that the boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) campaign targeting Israel, initiated by dozens of Palestinian civil society groups in 2005 in protest against Israel’s apartheid policies, is frightening the Israeli state, writes Lisa Gleeson.

The situation for Palestinian and Arab football (soccer) players in Israel, the West Bank and Gaza has, for some time, been dire.

On one side of Israel’s Apartheid Wall, within the formal borders of Israel, segregated youth teams, racist abuse, and heckling — including charming chants such as “Death to the Arabs” — are frequent. On the other, in the Palestinian territories occupied by Israel since 1967, checkpoint detention, jailings, and the bombing of stadiums have become regular features of what is supposed to be the people’s game.

Given the powerful role that football plays as a point of community cohesion in the West Bank and Gaza, this everyday violence feels like a full-frontal attack on civil society, normalcy and hope.

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