Culture

Sam Wallman is a talented political comic artist with a strong worker and union focus in his work, writes Andrew Chuter

The Robbery of Nature demonstrates the importance of understanding nature and society with a Marxist perspective, writes Neville Spencer.

Jane Mayer’s book reveals how a small group of libertarian capitalists in the United States pushed their ideology into the mainstream — and ultimately shifted public opinion and government policy, writes Sean Walsh.

Continuing his reviews of graphic novels and comics, Andrew Chuter presents Fun Home, Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir of growing up with her emotionally distant and closeted gay father.

Black Wave explores the rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia, and their struggle for influence in the Islamic world, writes Chris Slee

Dave Zirin argues striking players are posing the question that all great strikes pose: “Which side are you on?”

Political albums from August 2020

As US President Donald Trump continues to piss off musicians by using their music at his rallies, Mat Ward takes a look back at August's political news and the best new music that Trump definitely won't be playing.

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, born 250 years ago, was the most influential and prominent German philosopher of his time. Barry Healy reviews Andy Blunden's guide to understanding and applying Hegel to social change.

Indigenous scholar and activist Nick Estes’ book, Our History is the Future, provides a vivid account of the movement to halt Dakota Access Pipeline, writes Simon Butler.

Climate & Capitalism editor Ian Angus introduces five new books on fungi, climate and capital, food, bluefin tuna and Cuban agriculture.

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