Culture

Yesterday is a family-friendly rom-com that satisfyingly reaches a heart-warming and highly ethical conclusion. It is almost ridiculously wholesome, writes Tracy Sorensen.

Climate and Capitalism editor Ian Angus looks at five new books of interest to ecosocialists.

In A Natural Battleground, Bobbie Oliver, historian and author of the award-winning The Workshops — A history of the Midland Government Workshops, documents the ongoing attempts to preserve Western Australia's Government Railway workshops site.

Jake Johnson takes a look at how the US women’s football (soccer) team was driven by their struggle for equal pay, and used their Cup win to escalate the fight.

If you like boundary-challenging cinema, this is for you.

When the United States football (soccer) team beat France in the Women’s World Cup quarter final, it was two goals by US player Meagan Rapinoe that got them over the line. If the US go all the way to win the cup on July 7, Rapinoe will likely have played a decisive role. But the attacker had already made headlines, refusing to sing the national anthem and telling the media that, should the US win the cup, she will not “go to the fucking White House”. Lindsay Gibbs looks at the furore created by Rapinoe’s stances.

The Torrents is a long-neglected highlight of Australian theatre, which jointly won a 1955 competition for best Australian play with Summer of the Seventeenth Doll

This is a documentary the US Marine Corps did not want you to see.

Germany’s lower house of parliament, the Bundestag, recently passed a resolution equating BDS, which calls for economic and cultural sanctions against Israel over its apartheid-like policies towards Palestinians, with anti-Semitism.

Martin Empson takes a look at a compelling first-hand study that shows that fishing is a deadly occupation because capitalism forces workers to take terrible risks to survive. 

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