Jeremy Corbyn

Keir Starmer and Nigel Farage with background of prison fence

Since Conservative Party Prime Minister Rishi Sunak called the election, it has so far been a largely dull campaign, which from Brexit to Palestine, has ignored important issues and strategically focussed on trivia, reports Derek Wall.

Boris Kagarlitsky behind bars

Former radical left British Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn drew attention to the case of jailed socialist dissident Boris Kagarlitsky and other Russian anti-war political prisoners when he addressed the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe on April 17, reports Federico Fuentes.

The US Department of Justice’s claim that the Wikileaks founder directed a complex hacking operation has exploded. Sam Wainwright argues we must continue to demand justice for Assange.

At the end of October, Jeremy Corbyn was suspended from the British Labour Party, writes Jonathan Strauss. What Corbyn does next is a topic of discussion in and outside the party.

Death is touching everyone in Britain with fatalities from COVID-19 running at nearly a thousand a day, writes Derek Wall. So why is Prime Minister Boris Johnson still popular?

 

The British General Election, held on December 12, resulted in a huge victory for the right and a sweeping defeat for the left. Boris Johnson, a close ally of United States President Donald Trump, topped the poll with 43% of the vote for the Conservative Party.

Britain goes to the polls on December 12, in what could be the most important general election in a generation. Boris Johnson’s increasingly right-wing and chaotic Conservative Party is generally seen as the likely victor, but Labour’s left-wing leader Jeremy Corbyn could once again surprise, writes Derek Wall.

Following the European Union’s agreement to grant Boris Johnson’s government until next January to exit the EU, the House of Commons voted to hold a snap election on December 12. At the time of writing the election bill has yet to pass the House of Lords, but looks a certainty.

Politics in Britain is in turmoil. An early election will most likely happen as soon as December, or at the latest within a few months — the second early election since 2017.

This election will pit the Jeremy Corbyn-led Labour Party against various parties representing the interests of the 1%, including the governing Conservative party (Tories), the Liberal Democrats and the recently-formed, far right, Brexit Party.

The news that a solid gold toilet has been stolen from Winston Churchill's former home of Blenheim Palace seems symptomatic of the present British condition. The British ruling class are not merely having their bathroom fittings taken but they seem assailed by chaos on every side, writes Derek Wall.

Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of London on August 31 to oppose British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s plan to prorogue parliament and force through his Brexit agenda. More national mobilisations have been planned for September 7–8.

With only a few hours’ notice, thousands of people filled London’s Parliament Square on August 28 to protest against British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s plan to shut down parliament for several weeks ahead of the Brexit deadline on October 31.

The shutdown is aimed at undermining attempts by MPs to prevent a No-Deal Brexit, or attempts to move a motion of no confidence in Johnson’s leadership.

Chanting “You shut down the parliament, we shut down the streets”, more than 10,000 protesters blocked main thoroughfares around parliament for several hours.