Colombia

Colombia’s new government, led by President Gustavo Petro, has vowed to tackle violence and illegal mining, enact drug reforms and normalise relations with Cuba and Venezuela. Ian Ellis-Jones reports.

Gustavo Petro became the first left-wing president in the history of Colombia on August 7, reports People's Dispatch.

Colombia's Historic Pact wins election

The victory of the Historic Pact is expected to bring an end to decades of conservative and neoliberal politics which have dominated Colombia, reports People's Dispatch.

Francia Márquez and Gustavo Petro

A political earthquake struck Colombia last month, when the left-leaning Historic Pact won the first round of the presidential elections after getting 40.3% of the vote, write Vijay Prashad and Taroa Zúñiga Silva. Can the left break the cycle of violence to win the second round on June 19?

Historic Pact election poster

Leftist candidates Gustavo Petro and Francia Márquez won 40.3% of the vote in Colombia's election and will head to the second round against Rodolfo Hernández and Marelen Castillo from the Anti-Corruption League, reports Michele de Mello.

Indigenous protest in Colombia

Paramilitary violence continues to take lives and wreak havoc in Colombia, reports Peoples' Dispatch.

Gustavo Petro and Francia Marquez

The leftist Historic Pact presidential ticket, headed by Gustavo Petro and Francia Márquez, is favoured to win Colombia's presidential elections on May 29. However, the candidates face ongoing threats, reports Tanya Wadhwa.

Gustavo Petro addresses supporters in Santander, Colombia.

In Colombia, former guerrilla Gustavo Petro leads in the presidential polls. Petro is the lead candidate for a coalition of left political parties called Pacto Historico (Historic Pact), reports Ben Gilvar-Parke.

For the second year in a row, Colombia has been ranked the world’s most dangerous country for environmentalists by an international human rights group, reports Ian Ellis-Jones.

Amid rising levels of police and paramilitary violence, Yanis Iqbal looks at Colombia's history of state repression and people's resistance.

In the face of ongoing state repression, the Colombian people remain on the streets and continue resisting, write Laura Capote and Zoe Alexandra.

In response to days of national strikes and mobilisations across Colombia, security forces have unleashed unprecedented repression against peaceful protesters, reports People’s Dispatch.

The following appeal has been issued by United for Colombia, Australia, in response to the repression of nationwide protests that began in opposition to the government’s tax reform.

Since November 21, people have mobilised across Colombia to reject President Iván Duque’s anti-people and neoliberal policies.

On November 27, hundreds of thousands of students, teachers, workers and members of feminist, human rights, Indigenous, peasant and social organisations as well as trade unions, participated in mobilisations across the country.

In the capital Bogotá, huge numbers of people gathered at the National Park and marched to the Plaza de Bolívar, to reject the national government’s austerity measures and the heavy police repression of social protests.

A new phase of armed conflict in Colombia has emerged with the declaration by some former leaders of the FARC-EP (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia — People’s Army) that they are reorganising and rearming as an insurgent force, writes James Jordan.

Australian-based solidarity group United for Colombia released the following appeal on August 3 in response to continuing human rights violations in Colombia.

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