feminism

Communist and feminist Zelda D’Aprano became the symbol of the fight for equal pay when, in October 1969, she chained herself to the Commonwealth Offices in Melbourne, after becoming frustrated at the lack of pay equity for women.

D’Aprano was employed by the meatworkers union, which was involved in a test case on the gender pay gap in the meat industry before the Commonwealth Conciliation and Arbitration Commission. At the time, women’s participation in the workforce was 38% and they were paid 75% of men’s wages for doing the same work.

Last year was the year of women’s truth-telling about sexual and domestic violence. It was also the year that 49 Australian women met violent deaths.

In the second month of this year, there has been no respite from the unceasing onslaught of violence against women and the resulting murders.

To study these deaths is to uncover a blunt, chilling fact: the most dangerous place in Australia for a woman to be — and the most dangerous company for her to be in — is at home with her male intimate partner on a Saturday night.

International Woman's Day Film Night - Fear us Woman and Woman at War.

Resistance Centre, Level 5, 407 Swanston Street, Melbourne (opp RMIT), 6:30 pm (dinner from 6 pm).

Entry by donation.

Green Left Weekly will be hosting a double screening of Fear us Woman and Woman at War. Both documentaries explore the millitary and ideological struggle waged by Kurdish woman in Syria from the YPG who are at the forefront of the fight against ISIS and the woman-led feminist revolution unfolding in the autonomous regions of Northern Syria.

Rojava Revolution - why socialists support the pro-feminist, ecosocialist, multi-ethnic and democratic con-federalist revolution in northern Syria.

The Turkish government is attempting to eradicate the Kurdish-led project, but the Rojava project is surviving, albeit with the setback of the fall of Afrin. Get the latest on the situation in Afrin (now under brutal Turkish military occupation).

She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry reflects on the multi-layered strands of feminism in the US from the late 1960s through the mid 1970s.

It includes interviews with feminists from those times, and includes original footage of the battles that were waged.

In these times when women's rights are even more under attack from neoliberal governments here (and in the US) this film is a reminder of what the second wave of the women's movement achieved.



Unit 3, 29 Macquarie Street, Parramatta (5 minutes walk from the station).

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