Our Common Cause

Julian Assange is facing a show trial, designed to warn any whistleblower and journalist not to go down the same path. He is not on trial for any crime, but rather for exposing them, argues Sam Wainwright.

Peter Boyle argues growing inequality is not just unfair, it increases the power of vested interests to ignore the climate emergency and seek bigger subsidies for a recession-recovery plan built around the expansion of fossil fuel exports.

Alan Tudge says "foreign actors" are "straining" the country's social cohesion. Alex Bainbridge argues that if he was seriously worried, he could start by looking in the mirror.

The federal government’s response to the pandemic demonstrates how feasible it is to make dramatic changes in a short period of time, argues Alex Bainbridge.

Three unions have called for the scrapping of the working holiday visa program, claiming it will lead to better wages. But will it? Or is it an excuse to scapegoat and play the nationalist card, asks Zane Alcorn.

The main lesson from the disgraceful treatment of the elderly during the pandemic is that the privatisation of residential aged care must end, says Sue Bolton.

Shaming is a counter-productive way of dealing with those who flout the rules. But, as Alex Bainbridge argues, it is designed to deflect attention from the systemic failures in dealing with COVID-19.

The pandemic is serious and strong action needs to be taken to stop its spread. But punitive and paternalistic interventions, that remove people’s agency, is counterproductive, writes Sue Bolton.

Bipartisan mistreatment of refugees since 2001 has been a key feature of politics in Australia. But the movement for refugee rights has won some concessions and it could win more, writes Alex Bainbridge.

Scott Morrison’s melodramatic emergency media conference about an alleged, but unspecified, major cyber attack on Australia was calculated to instil fear. The context, as Peter Boyle writes, is the sustained and racist campaign by the Trump administration to scapegoat China for its own deadly failure to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic

Jim McIllroy argues the right’s culture wars are taking a hammering as Black Lives Matter-Stop Deaths in Custody movements rise.

The JobMaker plan is an attempt to get us to accept a return to the neoliberal regime that made jobs precarious, ran down public services and made housing and education unaffordable, writes Peter Boyle.

Home affairs minister Peter Dutton is using the COVID-19 pandemic to push through amendments to security laws that will further erode people’s rights, argues Vivien Miley.

Socialist Alliance has decided to withdraw from the Victorian Socialists because it has not lived up to its promise to build a more united left.

The slogan ‘There’s no going back to normal’ has gained considerable popularity as governments are forced by social necessity to take emergency steps they would not normally countenanced. Peter Boyle looks at how we can keep and extend these measures to cope with the next crisis.

“Normal” was so broken, we don't want to go back to that. But, as Sam Wainwright argues, we're going to have to build a movement strong enough to transform Australia’s economy.

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