Paris

Jordan Bardella

Marine Le Pen’s party has had a series of successes and is hoping to build further in coming months. Determined opposition will be crucial, writes John Mullen.

France Insoumise summer camp

Around 5000 people attended the radical left summer school of the France Insoumise (FI), held at the end of August at Valence in the South of France, reports John Mullen.

Jean Luc Melenchon

The left, under the banner of the newly formed Popular Union (NUPES), grew from 64 MPs to around 155 in the second round of the French parliamentary elections on June 19, reports John Mullen.

Poll of voter intention in France

In the run-up to June’s parliamentary elections, the political atmosphere in France has been transformed by a new left alliance, the New Popular Ecological and Social Union, reports John Mullen.

Emmanuel Macron

John Mullen shares his initial analysis of the French presidential election results.

France Insoumise election rally

John Mullen shares his analysis of the politics of Jean-Luc Melenchon and La France Insoumise.

France Insoumise election rally in Paris on March 20

Who is Jean-Luc Mélenchon and can his party La France Insoumise harness the anger of working people to bring about a radical change of government in next month's elections? John Mullen shares his analysis.

Next year's French elections will take place in a context where the parties of the left and right are in grave difficulty and the COVID-19 pandemic poses new problems for capitalists and anticapitalists alike, writes John Mullen.

Covid-19 and Third World debt

Rather than provide debt relief to developing countries struggling to bring COVID-19 under control, global financial institutions are continuing to impose neoliberal structural adjustment measures, write Eric Toussaint, Emilie Paumard, Milan Rivié.

Islamophobia in France has been growing in strength for many years, but has dangerously accelerated in recent weeks, writes John Mullen.

The second round of the French local elections was bad news for President Emanuel Macron and his austerity agenda, writes John Mullen

French President Emanuel Macron hopes to show bosses and the stock market he has a plan for recovery through the next few months, without half a million people dead or mass rioting in the streets, writes John Mullen.

Paris protest against Prayut

As Thailand's military dictator, Prime Minister and former General Prayut Chan-o-cha visited Europe last week in a desperate attempt to woo more foreign investment, Thai democracy rights protesters rallied in Paris, London and Bonn, calling for his arrest for crimes against his own people. They also called upon European governments to put human rights before profits.

A large march against austerity took place in Paris on April 12. Organised around the slogan “Enough is enough”, the theme of the demonstration was “against austerity, for equality and sharing the wealth”. At the head of the march were leaders of the French left: Jean-Luc Melenchon, leader of the Left Party, Pierre Laurent, leader of the Communist Party of France, and the New Anti-capitalist Party's Olivier Besancenot.
In what marks a significant shift in the balance of European politics, in the final round presidential election on May 6, Socialist Party candidate Francois Hollande defeated right-wing incumbent Nicolas Sarkozy of the centre-right Union for a Popular Movement by almost 52% to 48%. Hollande is France's first president from the social democratic Socialist Party in France in 17 years. Sarkozy is the first president since 1981 not to win a second term.
Presidential elections in France are a media spectacle rivalled perhaps only by those in the United States. In day-to-day life, there is also a real buzz as people argue and discuss the race on worksites, the street and, habitually, in cafes. Streets are plastered with posters of candidates and clever activist propaganda (over the top of some street signs here, activists have put up “Impasse Sarkozy”).
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