Issue 1305

News

Stephen Langford reports on a well-attended meeting in support of the self-determination struggle in West Papua.

The third Green Left-hosted feminist and LGBTIQ tour was a hit, reports Kerry Smith.

The PM's sacking of Australia Post CEO Christine Holgate has refocused attention on his efforts to privatise the public entity, writes Jim McIlroy.

Margaret Gleeson reports that despite the drop in electricity generation from some coal-fired power stations, the Environmental Justice Alliance has found little change in the amount of toxic emissions being emitted. 

Groups involved in the international campaign to free Abdullah Öcalan from a Turkish prison discussed plans to involve more community organisations. Peter Boyle reports. 

The families of those who have died in custody want to meet the Prime Minister. You can join their call by signing on to the petition, writes Kerry Smith.

Protesters took to Sydney's streets to support trans people's rights and oppose moves by NSW MLC Mark Latham to make it illegal for schools to teach inclusiveness and respect. Isaac Nellist reports.

Sydney protest against Black deaths in custody. Photo: Rachel Evans

Rachel Evans reports that First Nations activists and supporters rallied to mark the handing down 30th anniversary of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody.

Border Force and Queensland Police have forcibly transferred refugees from Kangaroo Point to BITA, a more remote detention centre near Brisbane airport, reports Alex Bainbridge.

Analysis

Prime Minister Scott Morrison had nothing to announce at the US-initiated World Leaders Climate Summit, reports Pip Hinman.

King tides and climate change have become survival issues for the world’s coastal cities, writes Rob Pyne.

Chloe de Silva reports on the growing grassroots campaign for nine refugees to be released from indefinite detention in Darwin.

The withdrawal of combat troops from Afghanistan is a welcome development. But, as Alex Bainbridge argues, it doesn’t mean that the warmongers in Canberra and Washington have been defeated.

Questions are being asked about why energy giant AGL is being allowed to get away with designating a pitiful amount of funds to rehabilitate its coal-fired power stations and coal seam gas operations, writes Zane Alcorn.

Sue Bull was on a bus from Canberra to Sydney’s Darling Harbour, 23 years ago, to take part in one of the most significant industrial disputes in recent history — the attack on the Maritime Union of Australia. Here, she reflects on the power of solidarity.

World

Sarah Glynn backgrounds a notorious show trial in Turkey that could send 108 leading members of the Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) — the third largest party in the Turkish parliament —  to life imprisonment

One hundred and eight leaders of the Peoples Democratic Party — the third largest party in the Turkish parliament — will face a show trial on April 26 that could see them imprisoned for life, reports Sarah Glynn.

The progressive Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) in Turkey has called for international solidarity on April 26, reports Peter Boyle.

COVID-19 cases are spreading rapidly in the Autonomous Administration of North and East Syria (AANES), also known as Rojava, reports Susan Price.

There are growing calls for Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte to resign over his government’s mishandling of the COVID-19 pandemic, corruption and brutality, reports Susan Price.

Australian-Canadian mining company OceanaGold is misleading the public about support for its mine in Central Luzon in the Philippines, reports Ron Guy.

John Tully looks at the history of repressive, and at times genocidal, anti-Kurdish policies that go back to the foundation of the Turkish Republic.

The verdict in the trial of George Floyd's killer has been handed down. Malik Miah looks at the trial, the Black Lives Matter movement and the changes needed to policing in the United States.

President Biden is attempting to shore up the US’ role as an international leader through multilateral agreements, with the expectation that Europe will fall in behind Washington, writes Barry Sheppard.

Many countries are living the worst wave of the pandemic at the moment, even though effective vaccines already exist. Fatima Hassan and Vijay Prashad take a look at what is behind the vaccination apartheid.

President Biden's reluctance to make any immediate changes in US policy toward Cuba is more than anything the result of domestic politics, writes Ian Ellis-Jones.

The Indian farmers movement has come to signify a democratic resistance to crony capitalism, communalism and authoritarianism, writes Ruchira Talukdar.

Culture

Judy Mundey, the patron of the newly-launched Dare to Struggle Film Festival, gave the following presentation after the screening of a new film about the life and politics of radical unionist Jack Mundey.

Renown British filmmaker and social activist Ken Loach is the target of a vicious smear campaign by pro-Zionist forces, writes Gavin Lewis.

Barry Healy reviews a new film depicting jazz singer Billie Holiday’s extraordinary courage in facing up to racism in the United States.