1243

Produced by Bill Carroll, a musician and long-time ecosocialist activist from Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

Hundreds of members of the Chilean community and supporters rallied in Sydney with the iconic Opera House in the background on October 27 in solidarity with the mass protests occurring in Chile right now. Similar protests were held in Brisbane, Melbourne and Perth.

Blocakde IMARC protest in Melbourne on October 30.

Environmentalists are going to have to get a whole lot more radical if Prime Minister Scott Morrison gets his way on proposed new measures targeting anti-mining activism.

Following the European Union’s agreement to grant Boris Johnson’s government until next January to exit the EU, the House of Commons voted to hold a snap election on December 12. At the time of writing the election bill has yet to pass the House of Lords, but looks a certainty.

A ferry workers strike in Brisbane on December 6, 2018.

Governments — and the corporations they serve — understand that as the economic and climate crises deepen, they will need to resort to more authoritarian measures to maintain their ecologically and socially destructive system.

A placard at a refugee rights rally in Sydney on July 21.

The government's treatment of refugees reads like something out of George Orwell’s seminal work, 1984. Fortunately, 1984 is fiction and we can force them to change.

Protesters blockade the IMARC mining conference in Melbourne on October 29.

Blockade IMARC Alliance was set up to disrupt business-as-usual for the corporate criminals attendance the conference — and when the conference rolls around again next year, we will be back, in even bigger numbers, to ensure we shut them down for good.

In part 2 of his series on Chile’s popular revolt, Pablo Leighton looks at the dynamics behind the protest movement and why Chileans won’t return to “normal”.

Police spray chemical foam at anti-IMARC protesters

A protester recounts how Victoria Police brutally attacked protesters with chemical foam and pepper spray at the peaceful blockade of the International Mining and Resources Conference on October 30.

Two weeks of sustained mass protests across Lebanon have forced the government of Prime Minister Saad Hariri to resign. At its peak, the movement united to form a 170 kilometre-long human chain from Tripoli to Tyre. While Hariri’s resignation met one of the movement’s demands, demonstrators have vowed to keep struggling for more fundamental change in the country. Nizar Hassan, who participated in the uprising as a member of the LilHaqqi movement, looks at the origins and dynamics behind the protests.

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