Culture

One small way we can express solidarity with Palestinian artists, writers and musicians is by learning about their work and sharing it with others, writes Markela Panegyres.

Barry Healy reviews a new film about the industrial mercury poisoning of a Japanese village and the photographer who exposed the story to the world.

Community radio 3CR is holding its annual Radiothon in June, reports Rachel Kirby.

Ecopella, a troupe of progressives who bring musical instruments, protest songs and humour to Sydney protests, have just released their fourth album, writes Miguel Heatwole.

Dean Imperial as Ray, a worker just trying to get by in the sardonic gig-economy altern

Barry Healy reviews Lapsis, a sci-fi film in which gig economy workers are manipulated into competing with each other — and with robots — to make a living.

Alex Salmon reviews Working Class History, a great tool for understanding how every gain workers and ordinary people have made has come through struggle.

Green Left speaks to Bob Zellner about Son of the South, a new film that tells his story of breaking from his Ku-Klux-Klan heritage to become the first white Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee organiser. 

10 new albums to help heal the world - May 2021

Mat Ward takes a look back at May's political news and the best new music that related to it.

A new book has revealed that crime rates in Australia have fallen markedly in the last two decades. But, as Chris Slee notes, the book's authors fail to adequately link crime rates to unemployment or other ecomonic factors.

Ian Angus presents seven new books about capitalist environmental destruction and the fight to save the Earth.

Lucas Till as anti-racism campaigner Bob Zellner in Son of the South

Barry Healy reviews Son of the South, the true story of Bob Zellner, a white student in Alabama who broke from the prevailing Jim Crow apartheid and nearly lost his life in the anti-racist struggle.

Paul Gregoire reviews a new the ground breaking four-part documentary series that puts genocide at the core of the western expansionist project.

The European Super League did not seek to grow the game, but rather promised a heavily marketised and Americanised product saturated with cash at the expense of traditions, writes Leo Crnogorcevic.

Andreas Malm’s call for minority violence is eloquent and sincere, but self-defeating, writes Simon Butler.

June marks eighty years since the invasion of the Soviet Union by Nazi Germany. It was a titanic struggle that decided the outcome of World War Two. One of the fronts of struggle was cultural, as Alex Miller explains.

Alex Miller reviews a highly speculative and naive work on the death of Albert Camus, who was perhaps France’s most prominent philosophical writer of the 20th century.

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