Issue 1296

News

Having locked out workers at its Smeaton Grange warehouse since November, Coles has just announced this measure will be extended indefinitely, reports Jim McIlroy.

Kerry Smith reports that hundreds of people, mostly from Sydney's Burmese community, turned out at short notice to protest against the military coup in Myanmar/Burma.

Activists from Quaker and Catholic community groups took action outside weapons manufacturer Nioa’s gates in Pinkenba, reports Kerry Smith.

Released refugees are pleading with supporters to keep up the pressure on the government until all refugees are released from onshore and offshore detention. Chris Slee reports.

A protest called by Gamilaraay Next Generation outside the officers of the Hunter Gas Pipeline company gave notive that the First Nations' owners would not back down, reports Pip Hinman.

The forced amalgamation of Marrickville, Ashfield and Leichhardt Councils into the Inner West Council has been an expensive failure, and impending big rate rises for many residents prove this, writes Pip Hinman.

The Indian community organised a rally to show support for farmers protesting against the Indian government's attempts to privatise and corporatise the agricultural sector, reports Jacob Andrewartha.

The Burmese community “splashed” the city’s Esplanade with red in protest at the coup in Burma/Myanmar, reports Jonathan Strauss.

Protests were organised in Melbourne and Sydney on February 6 to demand an end to the oppression of Tamils and Muslims in Sri Lanka. Chris Slee reports.

Analysis

Green Left is celebrating its 30th birthday. Peter Boyle takes a look at the idea behind this unique publication and what has sustained this people-powered project.

The Socialist Alliance strongly condemns the military coup in Myanmar/Burma and calls on the Australian government to deny recognition to the regime.

It may seem a surprise to learn that Australia’s sustainable development is currently ranked very low compared to other OECD countries, writes Patrick McDonald.

The New South Wales government's plan for “social housing” is all about helping its developer mates and pushing poorer communities out of inner city spaces. Paul Gregoire investigates.

Twitter’s permanent suspension of Donald Trump’s account on January 8 was an anti-climactic conclusion to a presidency that ultimately finished with a whimper rather than a bang, writes Leo Crnogorcevic.

As the debate over the efficacy and availability of various privately marketed anti-COVID vaccines intensifies here and internationally, the time to re-establish our own critical public medical institution is right now, argues Jim McIlroy.

Anti-tollway activists are disappointed that the Greens councillors seem to have accepted the North East Link is a fait accompli, writes Mary Merkenich.

This episode of the Green Left Show features Gauri Gandbhir, Lizzie O'Shea and Aleks Wansbrough focuses on the government's proposed media code, Google's threat to abandon Australia and the debate around online free speech.

Alex Bainbridge writes about Green Left's new video podcast — the Green Left Show — which aims to cover important topical issues and involve guests from the diversity of progressive opinion and campaign areas.

World

Last month's protests in Russia may have been sparked by the arrest of opposition figure Aleksey Navalny, writes Aleksandr Buzgalin, but they were mostly a mass response to the social and economic suffering of the people.

Turkey has opened a new front in its ongoing war of annihilation against the Kurdish liberation movement, writes Marcel Cartier.

Vaccinations must reach all the peoples of the world, or COVID-19 will continue to spread, with the threat of more dangerous variants emerging, writes Barry Sheppard.

As protests grow against the military coup in Myanmar, Australian mining companies are carrying on as if nothing happened, writes Allen Jennings.

Brazil's failure to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic arises from a combination of neoliberalism, crippling debt and anti-science virus denialism, writes Yanis Iqbal.

In a landmark decision, the International Criminal Court has affirmed its jurisdiction over war crimes committed in Palestine, opening the door to possible criminal charges against Israel, writes Susan Price.

Physician Susan Moore died of COVID-19 in December, after making a video from her bed describing the racism she experienced from a white doctor when she presented for treatment, writes Malik Miah.

Under new COVID-19 regulations, it is now a criminal offence — for the first time in South Africa’s history — to hold any kind of political gathering, writes Dale McKinley

Culture

David Robie reviews Australian journalist John Martinkus's new book about the Trans-Papua Highway, which is bringing military occupation, exploitation, environmental destruction and colonisation to West Papua.

Jeremy Goldstein

Barry Healy talks to the creator of Truth to Power Café, a theatrical experience where audience members are invited to respond to the question: “Who has power over you and what do you want to say to them?”