901

EMERGENCY OCCUPY SYDNEY PROTEST AT THE SUPREME COURT

Defend our right to protest!

The NSW police are taking Occupy Sydney organisers to the Supreme Court on November 4 to try to ban our planned march through the Sydney CBD.

The next “Freedom Wave” to Gaza is on its way. Sydney based youth worker Michael Coleman joins delegates from several countries on the Canadian boat Tahrir as it sets sail for Gaza.

Israeli has launched a series of air strikes on the Gaza Strip since October 29. ABC.net.au reported on November 2 that Israel was preparing its military for a ground assault on the besieged territory — home to about 1.5 million Palestinians.

At least 11 Palestinians have been killed, ABC.net.au said. Officials on both sides said at least seven members of Palestinian group Islamic Jihad (JI) had been killed,

For a lighthearted look at some of the difficulties and frustrations with the democratic process of the Occupy movement, have a look at The Meeting: A Democratic Satire, by Kahtia Lontis.

It is described as "a short satirical fiction piece based on the painful process of grassroots democracy". It is something anyone who has taken part in the movement could identify with.

A victory was achieved by the anti-memorandum, anti-government movement on October 28.

It was commemoration day of the resistance to the German occupation of Greece, which started in 1940. Across the whole country, the traditional student and military march was turned into an event of protest against the new occupation of Greece being enforced by the “troika” of the International Monetary Fund, the European Central and and the European Union.

See also
Greek people resist new troika attacks

The second Sunday forum of the Free University of Occupied Brisbane discussed “creative forms of protest” on October 30 in Post Office Square. Phil Monsour from Justice for Palestine talked about the boycott divestment and sanctions campaign against apartheid Israel.

On October 18, about 200 students held a “Save Political Economy” demonstration at the University of Sydney, organised by the Political Economy Students Society (EcopSoc).

The university administration is considering abolishing political economy as a separate department.

The department was established in the 1970s after a big campaign of protests and occupations by students and staff who wanted economics courses that taught a wide range of theories — not just the right-wing orthodoxy.

The Philippines, one of the poorest Asian nations with a huge foreign debt ― caused by successive corrupt governments ― remains a place of simmering class tension.

In the past six weeks, there have been mobilisations around a range of issues.

On October 11, there was a national day of action against rising energy costs. There were protests right across the archiapelago.

Residents turned off their power for half-an-hour and created a “noise barrage” with whistles and horns.

The October 23 declaration of Libya’s “liberation” by the National Transitional Council (NTC), the de-facto government since taking Tripoli from former dictator Muammar Gaddafi on August 21, was a showcase victory for the West’s vision of how the Arab democratic awakening should progress.

An uprising began in Libya on February 17 — part of the popular rebellion that has broken out against dictatorial regimes across the Arab world. The Gaddafi regime's brutal repression — carried out with Western-supplied weapons — meant the rising turned into a civil war.

Pages

Subscribe to 901