'It's a massacre': Regime attacks protesters

Issue 
Pro-Mubarak thugs ride into the crowd of democracy protesters at Tahrir Square, Cairo, February 2. Photo from AlJazeera.net.

After as many as 2 million people took over Tahrir Square and the streets of Cairo, with millions more across Egypt, on February 1 to demand on end to the US-backed dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak, the regime responded with a violent assault on protesters continuing to occupy the square.

Below are two eyewitness reports from US-based progressive media outlet Democracy Now! on the events.

List of rallies across Australia in support of Egyptian democracy movement

See also:
Eyewitness: Millions march against Mubarak
US, Israel oppose Arab democracy
Socialist Alliance, Asian left statements of solidarity with the Arab revolt
Fidel Castro: Not even US support can save Mubarak

* * *

‘It’s a Massacre’: Eyewitness account of attack on peaceful Egyptian protesters by po-Mubarak forces

Cairo resident Selma al-Tarzi calls in a report from the streets of Tahrir Square, where violent clashes have erupted.

More coverage:
Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal
Al Jazeera live streaming from Egypt on the rising
Live blogging by the Angry Arab
Photo gallery

SELMA AL-TARZI: My name is Selma al-Tarzi. And right now I’m at the entrance of the square from the Egyptian Museum side.

It’s a massacre. They’re coming in in government cars, buses, and in thousands. They have knives. They are throwing Molotov bombs.

They are burning the trees. They are throwing stones at us. We managed to catch many of them. All of them are undercover police.

We don’t have a single ambulance. I’m walking down with a couple bottles of Dettol, to try and do whatever.

There are people unconscious. There are hundreds and hundreds of wounded, a lot of head injuries from the throwing of the stones.

A lot of people have broken arms and legs. Some people have crutches. Some people managed to get infiltrated with knives.

It’s a massacre.

We’ve been cleaning the square. We’ve been keeping it perfectly intact for the past nine days. And now we are forced to break the pavement they have been keeping so impeccable, to protect ourselves.

He’s forcing us to destroy the square, so he can say that we destroyed it.

More and more, this is not — this is not a demonstration anymore; this is war. I just want to tell them that there are 50,000 people here, demonstrators.

I wouldn’t call that Hosni Mubarak is sending his protectors or demonstrators. They are not. These are missionaries.

But here there are 50,000 innocent people getting hurt and wounded and killed. Many of them are women and children.

And they are all ready and prepared to stay here and die here, if this is what it’s going to take to make him leave, if this is what it’s going to take to make the world see that this guy is a criminal of war.

This is a mass murder of an innocent people, unarmed innocent people, of women and children and people who are demonstrating for their rights.

* * *

Live From Egypt: The True Face of the Mubarak Regime

By Sharif Abdel Kouddous, February 2

Democracy Now!

Cairo — The Mubarak regime launched a brutal and coordinated campaign of violence today to take back the streets of Cairo from Egypt’s mass pro-democracy movement.

Pro-Mubarak mobs began gathering near Tahrir square shortly after Mubarak’s speech on Tuesday night and held a rally in front of the state TV building on Corniche El Nile St. In the morning, they began marching around the downtown area in packs of 50 to 100.

These were not the same kinds of protesters that have occupied Tahrir for the last few days. These crowds were made up mostly of men, in between 20 and 45 years old.

Many wore thick leather jackets with sweaters underneath. They chanted angrily in support of Mubarak and against the pro-democracy movement. They were hostile and intimidating.

They repeatedly cursed Al Jazeera, asking cameramen at the scene if they worked for the Arabic news network. One man drew his finger across his throat to signal his intentions.

By midday on Wednesday February 2, their numbers had swelled dramatically and they began pouring into the downtown area heading straight for Tahrir Square.

The army, which had encircled Tahrir since Saturday, simply let them in.

The pro-democracy protesters inside formed a human chain inside to try and hold the mob at bay. Utilising their greater numbers, they initially succeeded in pushing them back non-violently and appeared to have them in full retreat.

But then, the mob attacked.

“Suddenly, rocks started falling out of the sky,” said Ismail Naguib, a witness at the scene. “Rocks were flying everywhere. Everywhere." Many people were hit. Some were badly cut, others had arms and legs broken.

“The mob then charged in, some riding on horseback and camels trampling and beating people. Groups of them gathered on rooftops around Tahrir and continued to pelt people with rocks.”

“It’s a massacre,” said Selma al-Tarzi as the attack was ongoing. “They have knives, they are throwing molotov bombs, they are burning the trees, they are throwing stones at us ... this is not a demonstration anymore, this is war.”

Some of the attackers were caught. Their IDs showed them to be policemen dressed in civilians clothes.

Others appeared to be state sponsored ‘baltagiya’ and government employees.

“Instead of uniformed guys trying to stop you from protesting. You’ve got non-uniformed guys trying to stop you from protesting,” Naguib said.

Meanwhile, pro-Mubarak crowds blocked all the entrances to Tahrir. They chanted angrily and pushed people back trying to get in.

The army was complicit in the siege, preventing anyone, including journalists from entering. The attack inside continued for several hours. At least 600 were injured and one killed.

Egypt’s popular uprising had come under a heavy and brutal assault nine days after it began.

This was the true face of the US-backed Mubarak regime that had repressed the Egyptian people for so many years. But this time, the whole world was watching.

While many pro-democracy demonstrators left Tahrir for the safety of their homes, a significant number remain inside, vowing not to leave until Mubarak does.

It remains to be seen how the protesters will respond but Friday will undoubtedly be a decisive day.

[Sharif Abdel Kouddous is a senior producer for the radio/TV show Democracy Now!.]

If you like our work, become a supporter

Green Left is a vital social-change project and aims to make all content available online, without paywalls. With no corporate sponsors or advertising, we rely on support and donations from readers like you.

For just $5 per month get the Green Left digital edition in your inbox each week. For $10 per month get the above and the print edition delivered to your door. You can also add a donation to your support by choosing the solidarity option of $20 per month.

Freecall now on 1800 634 206 or follow the support link below to make a secure supporter payment or donation online.