wages

United Workers Union members across seven Toll Group distribution centres accepted a new offer from Toll. Jim McIlroy reports.

Nurses in New South Wales are taking action against the state government's insulting pay offer and its refusal to agree to formal nurse-to-patient ratios. Niko Leka reports.

Mental health nurses from Belmont, John Hunter, Morriset, Maitland and the Waratah Mental Health branch are calling for a real wage rise and better conditions. Kerry Smith reports.

The government is crowing about the economic recovery. But when the pandemic supplement is cut at the end of March, people will be trying to survive on $43 a day. Graham Mathews reports.

Union protest

Jim McIlroy reports that nurses, teachers and other public sector workers protested the NSW Coalition government's effective wage cut imposed on COVID-19 frontline workers.

The underlying gross domestic product trend shows the profit share is up to an historic high and the labour share is down. Since 1975, more than $4 trillion has been shifted from wages to profits. Paul Oboohov explains how it got to this.

Peter Boyle argues growing inequality is not just unfair, it increases the power of vested interests to ignore the climate emergency and seek bigger subsidies for a recession-recovery plan built around the expansion of fossil fuel exports.

The Australian economy is set for a significant slowdown in response to the COVID-19 shutdown, with the jobless rate expected to climb to 10%. The question, asks Graham Matthews, is who will pay? 

The Malaysian Trade Union Congress (MTUC), several other trade unions and the Malaysian Socialist Party (PSM) have slammed as “humiliating” and “beggarly” the new Pakatan Harapan (Alliance of Hope) federal government's announcement that it would increase the country's minimum wage by just RM50 (A$17) a month to RM1050 ($350) from January 2019.

Unions are considering calling a mass workers' protest.

Staff at the Berkeley Living retirement village in Patterson Lakes, Victoria, walked off the job on September 15 after months of not being paid. Some staff returned the next day to look after residents on a voluntary basis.

Consumer Affairs Victoria is also investigating reports that the village operators owe money to former residents.

The daughter of a former resident backed up claims that staff had not been paid properly, but said they were providing the best care they were able to. “They are feeding the patients out of their own pockets,” she told ABC News.

Nearly 70 staff at eheadspace — the national youth mental health service headspace's round-the-clock telephone and online counselling provider — were told they had just 24 hours to sign on to individual agreements that locked in year-long wage freezes, or they would lose their jobs. A dispute has been listed in the Fair Work Commission after headspace refused requests to extend the deadline. "For an iconic healthcare service, they don't treat their staff with any better respect than 7-Eleven or Grill'd," Health and Community Services Union organiser Serena Ho said.
Activists demonstrated outside global big brand fashion outlets in the centre of Sydney's central shopping district on September 17 to demand that these companies pay the workers who make their products (in countries like Cambodia) living wages and respect their right to organise. Other solidarity actions in Australia were held in Canberra and Melbourne.
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