poverty

Here’s a novel idea: Instead of politicians voting themselves another pay rise, how about we give them a pay cut? A real pay cut. We ask them to do what a couple of million Australians are expected to do, week in and week out.

We're all familiar with the old maxim: “the rich get richer while the poor get poorer”. It is said as often with resignation as it is as a call to action.

Left unquantified it remains abstract but it is much easier to get worked up when the sheer scale of material inequality is in front of your face. Hence the growing outcry surrounding Oxfam's recent annual reports on global inequality that clearly demonstrate the concentration of world resources in the hands of the 0.1%.

As economists debate whether this year will be economically better or worse for Australia, one thing is certain: we will all get screwed even more this year.

Last week, BusinessDay Scope economic survey for 2017 issued its survey of 27 leading economists from financial institutions, academia and consultancies.

As part of this year's Anti-Poverty Week, a conference in South Australia A looked at how a lack of jobs is changing the nature of unemployment into an increasingly long-term phenomenon.

I have been made homeless twice in the past fifteen months and I am not the only one.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Census of Housing and Population (2011) revealed there were 26,238 homeless people between the age of 12 and 24. They make up 25% of Australia's homeless population, with women experiencing domestic violence and sexual assault making up the highest proportion of this age category.

Fearless
Milk Crate Theatre
Carriageworks, Sydney
September 13-22
$35, $25
www.milkcratetheatre.com

Milk Crate Theatre director Mirra Todd says his main goal is to get people thinking and talking about homelessness.

“All theatre is about starting a conversation,” the wiry, animated Todd tells Green Left at Milk Crate’s rehearsal rooms in Sydney’s Kings Cross.

Belmore Park (near Central Station), Sydney
The cashless debit card soon to be given to chosen Newstart recipents which forces spending of 80% of payments to assigned retail outlets such as Coles and Woolies. It restricts their cash to 20%. Aboriginal people on welfare payment in the NT have had the "Basics Card" forced on them for 10 and now a proposed federal government policy could mean it’s extension across the country to many other welfare recipients in spite of its breach of human riights and glaring failures in all trial areas.

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