Iraq War

The release of cabinet documents from 2003 under the John Howard government has failed to clarify exactly how it decided to send Australian troops to the Iraq War. Mark Robinson reports.

John Pilger should be remembered and honoured not just for his impressive body of work, but for being a brave — and at times near-lone — voice for truth against power, write Peter Boyle and Pip Hinman.

Soldiers marching in a line. Inset: Prime Minister Anthony Albanese

The government’s war powers inquiry recommends no fundamental reform, despite a majority of submissions arguing for parliamentary oversight before committing the country to wars. Pip Hinman reports.

Rohima Miah reports that thousands of peace and anti-war activists rallied in Washington under the banner "Fund People's Needs, Not the War Machine!"

A new report documents the ongoing human, social, economic and environmental toll of the Iraq war, reports Brett Wilkins.

Events marking the 20th anniversary of the illegal invasion of Iraq were organised across Australia, with calls to scrap AUKUS and free Julian Assange. Jacob Andrewartha reports.

The 20th anniversary of the then largest protest in world history is on February 15. As time passes, memories fade. But the huge 2003 protest against the Iraq war was worth remembering, argues Alex Bainbridge.

British soldiers in Iraq

A secret memo published by Stop the War UK details an April 2002 meeting between Tony Blair and George W Bush concerning military intervention to topple Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein, reports Kerry Smith.

Tony Blair has blood on his hands

Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair will receive a knighthood on June 13, but more than 1.2 million petitioners say he should be sent to The Hague as a war criminal, not honoured at Windsor Castle.

Protesters in blood spattered Tony Blair masks at a Stop The War demonstration in London, in 2010.

Former British prime minister Tony Blair should be on trial at The Hague rather than parading the medieval trappings of wealth and power, argues Lindsey German.

Cruelty has caught fire in Australian politics; cowardice has become the currency affecting exchange with Washington and London, argues Stuart Rees.

Supporters of Julian Assange in Sydney rallied outside the British Consulate. Michael Hatrick and Jim McIlroy report.