fossil fuels

The United Nations has designated Australia as having done the least out of 193 countries to combat climate change. Patrick McDonald reports.

The Adani mine is seven years behind schedule and the Big Four banks and many insurance companies have ruled out investing in the project. Jim McIlroy and Richard Boult report on the #StopAdani Roadshow. 

Wind is now one of the cheapest energy solutions, but the federal resources minister has vetoed help for a new wind farm in Far North Queensland. John Pratt reports.

The International Energy Agency has ruffled feathers by calling for no investment in new fossil fuel supply projects, writes Margaret Gleeson.

Sarah Ellyard, a member of the nurses and midwives union, says climate action is urgent.

The Western Australian election is shaping up as a referendum on the Labor government’s handling of COVID-19, with pundits expecting it to be returned with an increased majority, reports Sam Wainwright.

The European Investment Bank president has openly declared "gas is over" — an admission that squares with what climate experts have been saying for decades, writes John Queally.

Protests to demand jobs and a safe environment are still necessary or we face the recurring nightmare of last summer's bushfires, argues Steve O'Brien.

The bushfire royal commission has acknowledged what activists and scientists have been saying for decades: climate change is causing catastrophic weather events. Suzanne James argues we have to keep up the fight.

Peter Boyle reports on Ecosocialism 2020, which brought together activists from Brazil, Malaysia, the Philippines and Australia, to discuss how to step up the fight for system change.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is floating bringing forward billions of dollars worth of income tax cuts for the rich, arguing it will boost the COVID-19-ravaged economy. Jim McIlroy argues it won't help our economy and nor will the government's push for more gas. 

Climate campaigner Greta Thunberg urges us to join the dots, but Pip Hinman writes that our governments won't do so unless we make them.

Given the composition of the National COVID-19 Co-ordinating Commission, it is little wonder its pandemic “recovery” plan is based on public handouts to the corporate gas sector, write Margaret Gleeson and Pip Hinman.

While many radicals attended the National Climate Emergency Summit, they were not asked to present which, as Hans A Baer writes, meant it showcased the market wing of the climate movement.

There are two positive things to come out of the horrific bushfire crisis ripping through our country: recognition of the connection between global warming and more frequent and intense bush fires; and the inspiring courage and generosity of volunteers and emergency service personnel to protect their communities, despite being hugely under-resourced.

The global #ClimateStrike movement is more than just a call for genuine climate action. It is also a recognition that governments have failed to take the action that was both possible and necessary to avert catastrophe.

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