Climate Council

Climate expert, Australian National University emeritus professor and Climate Council member Will Steffen speaks to Green Left about climate science and politics in the lead up to the COP26 United Nations climate summit in Glasgow.

Climate action has never been a priority for Scott Morrison. He'd rather conspire with imperialist powers against China than face the music at COP26. Markela Panegyres reports.

Federal environment minister Sussan Ley is challenging a ruling that the government has a duty of care to children when considering the approval of fossil fuel projects, writes Paul Gregoire.

A decade of inaction means that the Paris Agreement goal of limiting warming to 1.5°C will not be met, according to the Climate Council. Patrick McDonald reports.

 When flying foxes drop dead from the heat, parts of the Hume Highway melt and Penrith in Sydney’s west is the hottest place on Earth with a temperature of 47.3°C, it is clear that extremes of heat are having a devastating impact.  

The extreme heat during early January in south-east Australia was global news and follows the “angry summer” of 2016–17.

Despite the overwhelming evidence that fossil fuels are and making many worse; despite the

announced on October 25 that last year, thanks to cost reductions and significant policy support in key countries, renewables have surpassed coal to become the largest source of installed power in the world. This has prompted the IEA to significantly boost its five-year forecast for renewable energy growth.

The Climate Council released this statement on May 2. * * * Climate records have tumbled during autumn with records shattered all over Australia. New records for the highest average monthly maximum temperature were set in April in Brisbane, Darwin and Hobart. Almost all of Australia's capital cities recorded at least 20 days with above-average maximum temperatures. The warm temperatures follow a record-breaking March in which Australia's average temperature was the warmest on record at 1.70°C above average.
The federal government has been widely criticised for its weak carbon emission reduction target announced on August 11. The new target of reducing emissions by 26 to 28% on 2005 levels by 2030 will replace the previous target of a 5% emissions reduction on 2000 levels. These targets are nowhere near enough to stay under a 1.5°C rise in global temperature, needed to prevent going over climate tipping points.
Subscribe to Climate Council