Australian News

By Tracy Sorensen SYDNEY — The Aboriginal Deaths in Custody Watch Committee has made a scathing reply to a column in the Sydney Morning Herald on March 19 by former NSW magistrate Kevin Waller. "The families of Aboriginals who have died in

By Peter Boyle MELBOURNE — The Wills by-election on April 11 is shaping up as a dry run for a full federal election. Labor and Liberal campaigns are being run by Prime Minister Paul Keating and opposition leader John Hewson. The policy debate

Ian Jackson On March 14, Ian Jackson died following a short illness. Ian, aged 33, fell ill while travelling throughout Europe during 1991. Upon his return to Australia, he was admitted to Woden Valley Hospital in Canberra. Ian had been active in

By David Mizon MELBOURNE — Of 74 maintenance and boiler house workers who struck for three months last year over health and safety issues and in support of their sacked shop steward, only 29 remained when maintenance workers at Hoechst's Altona

By Peter Boyle The Australian government is deliberately misrepresenting the Palestine Liberation Organisation's position on the conflict in the Arab-Persian Gulf, according to Ali Kazak, the PLO representative in Australia and ambassador to

SYDNEY — Ten thousand boisterous protesters marched in bad weather on February 10 in a spirited demonstration organised by the Network for Peace in the Middle East. The march ended at the Domain with a rally chaired by journalist Jane Singleton,

Young green campers plot to save planet By Patricia Corcoran SYDNEY — While military recruiting centres report an increase in unemployed young people seeking a career in the services and Dick Smith and Tandy are trying to interest young people

By Helen Jarvis SYDNEY — On January 25, Donna Burns died tragically, just three days before she was to leave for Cambodia on assignment for the trade union aid organisation APHEDA for which she worked as Asia Pacific project officer. Many

By Dave Mizon MELBOURNE — As part of the settlement to the Hoechst dispute, a Health and Safety Review Committee was set up to investigate the problem of DCB (dichlorobenzene) contamination. The committee was made up of an independent consultant

SYDNEY — The New South Wales ALP machine ("Sussex Street") and local members Peter Baldwin (federal) and John Murray (state) have been led a very merry dance here in recent days by the party's Haberfield Branch. The fracas has been caused by the

By Peter Boyle Environmentalists have cautiously welcomed the draft report of the Resource Assessment Commission into the effects of the proposed gold-platinum-palladium mine at Coronation Hill in Kakadu national park. While the report, released

Most of the marches and rallies in International Women's Day will express opposition to the war in the Middle East. In Sydney, writes Margaret Mayhew, IWD promises to be the most angry and militant in years. Bush's war in the Gulf and the

By Karen Fletcher BRISBANE — A historic alliance of conservationists, left parties, resident group activists and Australian Democrats has condemned the Liberal City Council's decision to place a massive land-fill dump in Rochedale, a residential

By Angela Matheson Australia's social welfare system doesn't work. Long queues and deteriorating service for people on welfare, coupled with industrial action amongst overloaded Social Security staff, indicate the breakdown in social welfare.

By Robin Osborne Many Sydneysiders remain sceptical about how the NSW Water Board is handling the city's sewage disposal dilemma, with concerns focussing on just how clean the ocean will be after hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent on

By Jonathan Singer PERTH — After more than a year of deepening recession in WA, the official unemployment rate has climbed from a low point of 5.5 per cent to 9.3 last month. But there is no end in sight to the spiral of rising unemployment.

Sinking ship creates oil slick By David Bass PERTH — Fertiliser and fuel oil have polluted large parts of the Recherche Archipelago off WA's south coast and the coast of Cape Le Grand National Park, following the sinking of the bulk carrier Sanko

By Philip Baker SYDNEY — About 100 activists from the AIDS Coalition To Unleash Power (ACT UP) demonstrated at the offices of the NSW Anti-Discrimination Board on February 14 to highlight the refusal of the board to hold a public inquiry into

NEWCASTLE — Labor Party Councillors have attempted to close down the permanent peace vigil in Newcastle's Civic Park. Peace activists have maintained the vigil since the war in the Middle East began. At a council meeting on February 19 at which

Bob Brown speaks at Qld Green Alliance dinner By Jim McIlroy BRISBANE — Tasmanian green independent MLA Bob Brown spoke out strongly for the future of green politics and in support of the Green Alliance campaign for the Brisbane City Council at a

By Tom Flanagan On the night of January 16, Jack Lomax awoke at 2 a.m. to hear wave after wave of B-52 bombers pass overhead. Jack, 61, a long-time peace and environment activist (a veteran of the Vietnam moratorium and Franklin River campaigns) and

Duck season to go ahead in three states By Mark Berriman The NSW government has declared March 16 to be the official opening day of the 1991 duck season. In Victoria the season will open on March 16 and in Tasmania on March 9. In spite of

By Angela Matheson SYDNEY — The gay community celebrated its sexuality on the streets of inner city Darlinghurst on February 17 in the annual lesbian and gay Mardi Gras parade. The event, which has been recorded in the Guinness Book of Records as

NEWCASTLE — Hunter region unemployment figures are maintaining their historic trend of being above NSW averages. Figures for the December quarter show an unemployment rate of 7.5% compared to a state average of 6.6%. The situation in the Lower

By Garry Walters and Ian Close MELBOURNE — A "Police Frame-ups" public meeting, organised by the Campaign Exposing the Frame-up of Tim Anderson and other groups on February 20, heard speakers from the Aboriginal and Irish struggles and the

By Nigel D'Souza While the government publicly condemns the racist attacks against Arabs and Muslims in the wash of the Gulf War, in private it is conducting a campaign of harassment against these communities which makes a mockery of the formal

By Mark Horstman BRISBANE — More than 300 environmentalists, trade unionists, Aborigines, industrialists and interested people from around Australia spent Sunday, February 17, discussing ways to resolve environmental disputes. The community

By Liam Mitchell ADELAIDE — A $1 billion blowout of the State Bank's budget has prompted the establishment of a Royal Commission to investigate the funds of the bank, as well as calls from opposition members for premier and treasurer John Bannon

By Anna McCormack BRISBANE — Fifteen months after the election of the first state Labor government in 33 years, women's abortion rights are still outlawed, termination of pregnancy being the only medical procedure controlled by the Criminal

Peace Camp a 'unique experiment' By Jim McIlroy BRISBANE — The Gulf Peace Camp, which ended its stay 2 km from the Iraqi-Saudi Arabian border on January 28, was "an amazing and unique experiment in non-violent struggle", camp member Jerry Smith

Aborigines claim Cape York land By Philippa Stanford BRISBANE — A furore broke out in Queensland when it was discovered that Aborigines are seeking more than 60 million hectares of Cape York land (including the proposed Cape York space base site)

By David Mizon MELBOURNE — Conditions for workers at Shell's Geelong plant are to worsen seriously under proposals put forward late in February by the plant Award Restructuring Steering Committee. The steering committee was made up of

By Norm Dixon An Australian military official helped cover up the involvement of Australian-supplied Iroquois combat helicopters in the brutal execution of six Bougainvilleans by PNG troops in February last year, according to the second part of a

By Janine Prince and Philippa Stanford BRISBANE — Women on campus here are fighting to maintain services and rights that are under attack. The women's rights area at the University of Queensland is threatened by a student executive that has

By Peter Boyle The days are now shorter in Kuwait. Sometimes in early afternoon the sun is blocked out by clouds of black smoke from the hundreds of burning oil wells. Kuwaiti Oil officials estimate that it might take up to four years to put out

Illawarra Steelers and State Rugby League player Rod Wishart and women's surf champion Jenny Gill were among the 190 participants in the inaugural Swim for Guatemala in Wollongong on February 23. Jointly oragnised by the Committee in Solidarity with

By Leon Harrison PERTH — The state government's plans for tourist development of Rottnest Island are meeting determined opposition from Aboriginal people are fighting to protect burial sites and to turn the old jail into a museum. From 1838

Carpenters union leadership in doubt By Michael Bull MELBOURNE — The leadership of the Victorian branch of the Association of Carpenters and Joiners has been changed twice in the last few weeks following revelations that large sums of money have

By Catherine Brown PERTH — "Equity, Equality and Participation" was the theme of the inaugural Trades and Labor Council annual conference. Held days, February 15-16, the conference was a new and welcome concept for a union movement lacking any

Secondary students denounce US war By Wendy Robertson and Tony Iltis MELBOURNE — About 100 people attended a rally outside the GPO called by Secondary Students Against the Gulf War on Friday, March 1, to highlight that, for the people of the

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