Analysis

There is nothing better in these times than reading the words of James Connolly, the Irish republican, socialist and trade union leader, executed by the British firing squad on May 12, 1916, writes Sam Wainwright.

Foreign Minister Penny Wong has offered to fund the Solomon Islands elections, writes Binoy Kampmark. It was an offer that would irk any sovereign state.

The Pitch Black military exercises are one element in a series that tie Australia to US plans for retaining its regional military dominance in the face of China’s rise, writes Vince Scappatura

The union movement faces big challenges in ensuring that any changes to bargaining extends workplace rights and protections. Sarah Hathway reports.

Housing is a human right

The Australian Greens' proposal for a two-year rent freeze is a workable and clear response to the housing crisis, writes Alex Bainbridge.

Josie Alec and Petrina Harley talk about the campaign to save the Burrup and oppose the Scarborough gas hub.

There is a big gap between the headlines and the reality facing skilled migrants trying to find employment in their profession. Khaled Ghannam reports.

The rising cost of living and the strain on public services mean Labor must junk its support for the Coalition's stage 3 tax cut policy, argues Mary Merkenich.

A year after Scott Morrison signed Australia up to the AUKUS “security” treaty, the United States and British partners are providing more information about the secretive weapons’ arrangement. Pip Hinman reports.

A rank-and-file ticket is contesting executive and council positions in the WA branch of the Australian Nursing Federation in late October. Chris Jenkins, who is part of it, reports.

 

The gender pay gap — a measurement of gender equality in the workplace — is growing. Andrea Bortoli reports.

Qantas received $2 billion in federal assistance — via the taxpayer — and still sacked 5000 employees. Binoy Kampmark argues its business model is in tatters.

Under a new umbrella — Public Sector Alliance — government workers in Western Australia are determined to break WA Labor’s wages cap policy. Janet Parker reports.

While university managements are boasting huge surpluses, they are refusing to make their largely casualised staff permanent and award them pay rises. Binoy Kampmark reports.

Senator Jordon Steele-John has accused Labor of failing to draw on the expertise of the lived experience of disability advocates and fears that mistakes will be repeated. Nova Sobieralski and Zoe Wing report.

Labor’s review of Australia’s defence capability is likely to continue the same big spending on offensive weapons and make the Asia-Pacific an increasingly dangerous place, argues William Briggs.

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