Issue 1294

News

WA Supporting Farmers and the Sikh Council of Western Australia have organised a protest in front of the consulate general of India in solidarity with farmers’ protests, write Gauri Gandbhir and Alex Salmon.

Under immense pressure from a greedy employer, 350 workers have returned to work after being locked out of the Coles Smeaton Grange warehouse in Western Sydney for 12 weeks. Jim McIlroy reports.

A funeral procession for koalas was organised by Extinction Rebellion and other supporters of the endangered native, writes Kerry Smith.

Margaret Gleeson reports on a resident-organised protest aimed at getting a dirty coal-fired power station on the NSW Central Coast to clean up its act.

Chris Slee reports on a gathering outside the Magistrates Court to support an activist on trial for “inciting” people to support detained refugees.

Rachel Evans writes 10,000 people streamed into Sydney Domain for the Invasion Day rally, it became very clear the NSW government had overplayed its hand — again,.

Tens of thousands have turned out around the country for Invasion Day protests, reports Kerry Smith.

Fossil Free SA and Extinction Rebellion SA have organised a week of climate action to draw attention to the disastrous impact of gas and call for the Tour Down Under to #BreakAwayFromGas, reports Kerry Smith.

Chris Slee reports on a new international solidarity campaign with sacked workers from the Ansell factory in Sri Lanka’s Biyagama Free Trade Zone.

 

Western Australia’s Tigrean community have organised a second rally against the Ethiopian government's war on the Tigray province. Alex Salmon reports.

The Sikh community in Western Australia is spearheading a solidarity campaign with Indian farmers protesting the BJP government’s anti-farmer laws, reports Alex Salmon.

The release of refugees from detention has given activists hope that there will be a change in policy. But, as Chloe DS writes, they won't stop organising until all refugees are released and given permanent protection.

Analysis

This year marks 30 years of Green Left. Its longevity comes down to it being a people-powered project. With its expanding multimedia platforms, there's room for you too, writes Peter Boyle.

Marianne Mackay and Sam Wainwright argue that the forced clearing of the Fremantle homeless people’s camp demonstrates the WA Labor government's failure to address homelessness.

The Socialist Alliance argues that Australia is the aggressors in the growing trade war with China.

Green Left has launched a new show, with its first episode focused on Invasion Day. It features First Nations activists Lidia Thorpe, Marianne Mackay and Elizabeth Jarrett.

Federal Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is very upbeat about the economy, despite an official unemployment rate of 6.6% and a growing wealth divide. Peter Boyle investigates.

The climate-denying federal government is putting Australia on track to reach net zero emissions in 300 years, writes Sarah Hathway.

To mark its 30th birthday, Green Left editors Pip Hinman and Susan Price discuss this unique people-powered media project, it origins, the development of its ecosocialist vision and the paper’s role in building grassroots movements.

Alexander Brown, Melanie Barnes and Nick Southall write about John Rainford's contributions to communist, labour and social movements.

World

Indian farmers, who have been protesting for the past two months, have again made a stand against Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s agenda to privatise and corporatise the agricultural sector, reports Gauri Gandbhir.

Studying the lessons of the attack on the Capitol and the events leading up to it is essential to defeating the white-supremacist, far-right threat, write Malik Miah and Barry Sheppard.

Once at the centre of the region's left turn, Brazil has for the past two years been governed by a far-right president. Michael Fox spoke to Green Left about the significance of recent events there.

S. Arutchelvan spoke to Green Left about what's behind Malaysia's king declaration of a state of emergency in the wake of a spike in COVID-19 infections. 

The European Investment Bank president has openly declared "gas is over" — an admission that squares with what climate experts have been saying for decades, writes John Queally.

The sudden surge in numbers of COVID-19 cases in the Brazilian state of Amazonas has caused a collapse in the public health system with a lack of ICU beds and oxygen, writes People's Dispatch

In the dying days of his presidency, Donald Trump’s administration redesignated Cuba a state sponsor of terrorism, writes Ian Ellis-Jones.

Culture

Santiago Rising takes viewers to the streets of Chile’s capital city as the 2019-20 protests unfolded, introducing them to the social movements, protesters and people behind the rebellion, writes Federico Fuentes.

Political albums from January 2021

Mat Ward takes a look back at January's political news and the best new music that related to it

Ernst Merkenich asks: Is Microsoft seeking to raise the dead?

Andrew Chuter reviews a 2014 graphic novel that communicates the science, politics and personal impacts of what is arguably humanity’s greatest existential threat.

Dancers

Susan Price reviews a new performance work that takes audiences through Parramatta Park, responding to the valuable cultural, social and historical biography of the area.

Film poster overlays photo of 2006 youth protest in Ramallah

Barry Healy reviews Mayor, a new documentary that shows the reality of life in Ramallah under Israeli ocupation.