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Green Left Weekly is planning to run ongoing coverage on the dramatic developments in the struggle for democracy and justice in Honduras over the coming days. Six reports, from September 21-25, are published below. To listen to an inteview with Democracy Now! journalist Andres Conteris, who is inside the Brazilian embassy with legitimate Honduran President Manuel Zelaya, visit LatinRadical
Residents of Hato de Enmedio, Tegucigalpa, take control of their barrio. September 22: Protests outside the Brazilian embassy, where legitimate President Manuel Zelaya is, being violently broken up by police
Caracas, September 21, 2009 (Venezuelanalysis.com) - Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez today congratulated the democratically elected president of Honduras, Manuel Zelaya on his "heroic" return to his homeland eighty-six days after he was ousted by a military coup on June 28. Chavez also called on the coup regime, headed by Roberto Micheletti, to peacefully hand over power to Zelaya.
Democracy Now! report on Zelaya's dramatic return to Honduras part 1: Part 2:
On September 2, 40 people attended a public forum organised by Refugee Action Collective (RAC) Queensland on the treatment of asylum seekers under the Rudd Labor government.
Workers at Autoliv, a manufacturer of automotive safety equipment in Melbourne, took industrial action in early September for better wages and conditions. The second stoppage ever for the workers delivered an early finish each week of one hour and five minutes; redundancy payments; payout of all sick leave if workers leave the company; and a pay increase of 4.2% over two years, up from 2%.
“If you don’t give a shit, that’s what you get”, was a favourite chant of striking Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) city campus staff at their picket lines on September 16.
Eighteen-year-old South African athlete Caster Semenya has done nothing wrong. Yet she has been accused of deceiving the world about her gender. There is nothing wrong with Semenya’s body. Yet her body has been paraded in front of the world by the mass media as if she were a sideshow freak.
With the 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission's Interim Report tabled last month, it is now up to various state governments and the federal government to respond quickly to save lives when the next catastrophic fires happen.
Over September 12-13, more than 400 people travelled to the Hazelwood coal-fired power station in Victoria’s Latrobe Valley to send a clear message: “Switch off Hazelwood, switch on renewables.”
In 1978, John Reid, chair of James Hardie Industries, boasted: “Every time you walk into an office building, a home, a factory; every time you put your foot on the brake, ride in a train … the chances are that a product from the James Hardie group of companies has a part in it”.
The following sign-on statement asks people to join and/or support the Climate Camp protests at the Port Augusta power stations in South Australia from September 24 to 27. To add your name visit climatecampsa.org.
Battlelines By Tony Abbott Melbourne University Press, 2009 $34.99, 187 pages
Sixty people protested outside the closed Solar Systems factory in Abbotsford on September 18. The factory closed a week earlier when Solar Systems went into receivership due to its major investor, TRUenergy, withdrawing its investment.
Quique Cruz sums up the story of his long life journey towards the creation of an extraordinary work of art and human testimony called Archaeology of Memory: “The day after my nineteenth birthday, I was detained by Pinochet’s secret police and spent one month as a desaparecido in the Villa Grimaldi torture centre.
Many Tongues: One Voice – Looks at how communities are retrieving their dormant languages and maintaining these languages through promoting and teaching not only Aboriginal youth but all Australians. ABC1, Friday, September 25, 6pm. The

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