Canada

Climate & Capitalism editor Ian Angus introduces five new books on fungi, climate and capital, food, bluefin tuna and Cuban agriculture.

Climate and Capitalism editor Ian Angus recommends six books for understanding the deadliest global health crisis of our time.

 

Five studies, all published in the past six weeks, indicate that global heating is intensifying more rapidly than expected, writes Ian Angus, giving increased urgency to the fight for a safe climate future.

Canadian socialist and feminist Suzanne Weiss begins her recent memoir with these words by W B Yeats: “There are no strangers here, only friends you have not yet met.” More than just an epigram, they describe a practice of solidarity that saved Weiss from the Holocaust and later shaped her more than six decades of activity as a life-long socialist, writes James Clark.

Every degree of global warming will push a billion people out of the human survival zone, writes Ian Angus.

Solidarity actions by Indigenous and non-Indigenous groups in support of Wet'suwet'en land rights and against the construction of an illegal gas pipeline could be a turning point for Indigenous rights in Canada and the global climate movement, writes Gauri Gandbhir.

At this point in human history, the limits of capitalism and the limits of our species’ life on Earth have converged. Laurie Adkin argues we have never been here before, and we cannot go back.

Demonstrations in solidarity with Wet'suwet'en land defenders fighting against a proposed fracked gas pipeline continue across Canada, writes Jessica Corbett.

Climate and Capitalism editor Ian Angus takes a look at five new books that belong on an ecosocialist bookshelf.

If you’re looking for an accessible summary of revolutionary theory and practice related to the climate crisis and how to overcome it, System Change Not Climate Change is a must-read, writes Valerie Lannon.

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