Canada

Climate and Capitalism editor Ian Angus takes a look at five new books that belong on an ecosocialist bookshelf.

If you’re looking for an accessible summary of revolutionary theory and practice related to the climate crisis and how to overcome it, System Change Not Climate Change is a must-read, writes Valerie Lannon.

Bastani frequently quotes Marx, but his economics are Keynesian, his history is crude technological determinism, and his political program doesn’t go beyond social democratic reforms, writes Ian Angus.

Climate and Capitalism editor Ian Angus looks at five new books of interest to ecosocialists.

Quebec’s October 1 general election campaign in Quebec unfolded as two distinct contests, writes Richard Fidler.

One contest was the competition between the Liberals and Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) for control of the government.

The other contest in the predominantly French speaking province of Canada, with a long history of struggling for national sovereignty, was between the Parti québécois (PQ) and Québec solidaire (QS) for hegemony within the pro-sovereignty movement.

Canada’s historic vote in June to legalise cannabis is yet another nail in the coffin of the so-called War on Drugs, conceived in the 1970s by then US-president Richard Nixon, writes Natalie Sharples.

“So called” because it was deliberately conceived to obscure what it really was: not a war on substances at all, but on Black people and the anti-war left.

Prisoners across the United States launched a prison strike for August 21-September 9, which has since spread into Canada.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau challenged Donald Trump’s nationalism at the G7 summit in Québec last month, but that doesn’t mean he provides the alternative people and planet need, writes Todd Gordon.

One of the few talents Donald Trump has as a politician is to make others around him look far more attractive than they really are.

In online communities celebrating misogyny and decrying men's so-called “involuntary celibacy”, the suspect in the April 23 van attack in Toronto was being lauded as a “new saint”. This caused some on social media to urge a closer look at the link between such groups and mass violence.

With the release of the full text of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) on February 21, activists in the 11 signatory countries finally got to see if their worst fears of a corporate power grab would be confirmed.

Unfortunately, they mostly were.

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